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Born Southern: Childbirth, Motherhood, and Social Networks in the Old South (review)

Born Southern: Childbirth, Motherhood, and Social Networks in the Old South (review) patricia cline cohen, professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of The Murder of Helen Jewett: The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York (1998) and coauthor of The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (2008). Born Southern: Childbirth, Motherhood, and Social Networks in the Old South. By V. Lynn Kennedy. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Pp. 288. Cloth, $65.00; paper, $30.00.) In Born Southern, V. Lynn Kennedy examines the significance of birth in antebellum southern life. Drawing on prescriptive literature such as stories, magazine articles, and poems; Works Progress Administration narratives; letters; and diaries, she explores how a range of southerners, both men and women, understood and experienced the various stages of birth, from conception, through pregnancy, to nurturing the newborn infant. Kennedy argues in her comprehensive study that the proximity of free and enslaved people made the southern experience of birth unique, contributing to the construction of a distinctively regional identity during the antebellum period. As the sectional crisis intensified, the cultural and social role played by birth assumed broader political significance, providing southerners with a language through which to express their commitment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Born Southern: Childbirth, Motherhood, and Social Networks in the Old South (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (3) – Aug 29, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

patricia cline cohen, professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is the author of The Murder of Helen Jewett: The Life and Death of a Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century New York (1998) and coauthor of The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (2008). Born Southern: Childbirth, Motherhood, and Social Networks in the Old South. By V. Lynn Kennedy. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Pp. 288. Cloth, $65.00; paper, $30.00.) In Born Southern, V. Lynn Kennedy examines the significance of birth in antebellum southern life. Drawing on prescriptive literature such as stories, magazine articles, and poems; Works Progress Administration narratives; letters; and diaries, she explores how a range of southerners, both men and women, understood and experienced the various stages of birth, from conception, through pregnancy, to nurturing the newborn infant. Kennedy argues in her comprehensive study that the proximity of free and enslaved people made the southern experience of birth unique, contributing to the construction of a distinctively regional identity during the antebellum period. As the sectional crisis intensified, the cultural and social role played by birth assumed broader political significance, providing southerners with a language through which to express their commitment

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

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