Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Bittersweet Legacy: The Black and White "Better Classes" in Charlotte, 1850-1910 (review)

Bittersweet Legacy: The Black and White "Better Classes" in Charlotte, 1850-1910 (review) 114Southern Cultures American pattern with global resonances. To me, as a male southerner, Romance is provoca- tive in tracing the genesis of taken-for-granted, yet demeaning and painful stereotypes, with which we still live. Bittersweet Legacy: The Black and White "Better Classes" in Charlotte, 1850-1910. By Janette Thomas Greenwood. University of North Carolina Press, 1994. 318 pp. Cloth, $45.00. Reviewed by Frye Gaillard, former southern editor at the Charlotte Observer and writer in residence at Queens College in Charlotte. His recent works include The Dream Long Deferred and Lessons From the Big House: One Family's Passage Through the History of the South. The history of race relations in the South has probably never seen a more bitter chapter than the period near the end of the nineteenth century when the promise of full freedom was snatched away from a generation that had worked so hard to earn it. Janette Thomas Greenwood tells that story in heartbreaking detail in this study of the New South city of Charlotte. Her broad themes may be familiar, but her particular understandings are not. They are provocative and fresh, a bittersweet account of lost possibilities that lay dormant in the South for more than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Bittersweet Legacy: The Black and White "Better Classes" in Charlotte, 1850-1910 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 4, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/bittersweet-legacy-the-black-and-white-better-classes-in-charlotte-vOeIKyfNv0
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

114Southern Cultures American pattern with global resonances. To me, as a male southerner, Romance is provoca- tive in tracing the genesis of taken-for-granted, yet demeaning and painful stereotypes, with which we still live. Bittersweet Legacy: The Black and White "Better Classes" in Charlotte, 1850-1910. By Janette Thomas Greenwood. University of North Carolina Press, 1994. 318 pp. Cloth, $45.00. Reviewed by Frye Gaillard, former southern editor at the Charlotte Observer and writer in residence at Queens College in Charlotte. His recent works include The Dream Long Deferred and Lessons From the Big House: One Family's Passage Through the History of the South. The history of race relations in the South has probably never seen a more bitter chapter than the period near the end of the nineteenth century when the promise of full freedom was snatched away from a generation that had worked so hard to earn it. Janette Thomas Greenwood tells that story in heartbreaking detail in this study of the New South city of Charlotte. Her broad themes may be familiar, but her particular understandings are not. They are provocative and fresh, a bittersweet account of lost possibilities that lay dormant in the South for more than

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

There are no references for this article.