Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Becoming Lincoln by William W. Freehling (review)

Becoming Lincoln by William W. Freehling (review) Holt’s book has many strengths. It illustrates how politicians reap- praised their positions, demonstrates why most Constitutional Unionists would never join an anti-Republican coalition, explains how slavery undermined the Democratic Party, underlines Democratic corruption as a campaign issue, shows how Republicans won in the Lower North, high- lights how southern Democrats defined the campaign, and accentuates how politicians’ actions have consequences. Yet Holt’s assessment of the Republican Party could have gone further. He often relies on conservative Republican voices, such as New York Times editor Henry Raymond, who urged Republicans to moderate their antislavery positions. He neglects, however, the Upper North, from where most Republican votes—and most Republican representatives—came. After Republican representatives and senators jettisoned moderation during the Thirty-Seventh Congress, their party’s losses in 1862 were more severe in the Lower North than elsewhere. Did Lower North conservatives finally realize that Republicans were more radical than those conservatives thought them to be? Naturally, those 1862 losses—and their meaning—are topics for other books. And this book, like all of Holt’s scholarship, will provoke and reward scholars. John W. Quist john w. quist is a professor of history at Shippensburg University and the editor of Michigan’s War: The Civil War in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Becoming Lincoln by William W. Freehling (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (1) – Mar 2, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/becoming-lincoln-by-william-w-freehling-review-9iZINC3B3F
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Holt’s book has many strengths. It illustrates how politicians reap- praised their positions, demonstrates why most Constitutional Unionists would never join an anti-Republican coalition, explains how slavery undermined the Democratic Party, underlines Democratic corruption as a campaign issue, shows how Republicans won in the Lower North, high- lights how southern Democrats defined the campaign, and accentuates how politicians’ actions have consequences. Yet Holt’s assessment of the Republican Party could have gone further. He often relies on conservative Republican voices, such as New York Times editor Henry Raymond, who urged Republicans to moderate their antislavery positions. He neglects, however, the Upper North, from where most Republican votes—and most Republican representatives—came. After Republican representatives and senators jettisoned moderation during the Thirty-Seventh Congress, their party’s losses in 1862 were more severe in the Lower North than elsewhere. Did Lower North conservatives finally realize that Republicans were more radical than those conservatives thought them to be? Naturally, those 1862 losses—and their meaning—are topics for other books. And this book, like all of Holt’s scholarship, will provoke and reward scholars. John W. Quist john w. quist is a professor of history at Shippensburg University and the editor of Michigan’s War: The Civil War in

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 2, 2020

There are no references for this article.