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Baroque New Worlds: Representation, Transculturation, Counterconquest (review)

Baroque New Worlds: Representation, Transculturation, Counterconquest (review) activism can compromise artistic integrity, as revealed in the shortcomings of To Have and to Have Not and e F Th ih C ft olumn. Stoltzfus’s comparison of Malraux’s L’espoir and Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls seeks to explain the well- known antagonism between the two writers on the basis of an encounter between two aesthetic perspectives and practices. As Stoltzfus explains, For Whom the Bell Tolls, while it contains postmodern features with elements of self- aware narration, is nevertheless a referentially realist novel grounded in plot and individual character. L’espoir, with its “panoramic simulta- neity” (125), though not a self- aware postmodern work, breaks with classical nar- ration by focusing on collective action. In Stoltzfus’s view, Malraux’s emphasis on fraternal engagement can be linked to early twentieth century Unanimism. Such a comparison elicits a fresh consideration of these two widely admired novels of the Spanish civil war, although Stoltzfus’s observation that “Malraux’s characters are flattened out, as in modern painting” (123) may be challenged by a fuller consider- ation of a characters like Manuel, the leader who must undergo profound personal changes in order to command ee ff ctively. Following a consideration of Proustian themes in Across http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Baroque New Worlds: Representation, Transculturation, Counterconquest (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

activism can compromise artistic integrity, as revealed in the shortcomings of To Have and to Have Not and e F Th ih C ft olumn. Stoltzfus’s comparison of Malraux’s L’espoir and Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls seeks to explain the well- known antagonism between the two writers on the basis of an encounter between two aesthetic perspectives and practices. As Stoltzfus explains, For Whom the Bell Tolls, while it contains postmodern features with elements of self- aware narration, is nevertheless a referentially realist novel grounded in plot and individual character. L’espoir, with its “panoramic simulta- neity” (125), though not a self- aware postmodern work, breaks with classical nar- ration by focusing on collective action. In Stoltzfus’s view, Malraux’s emphasis on fraternal engagement can be linked to early twentieth century Unanimism. Such a comparison elicits a fresh consideration of these two widely admired novels of the Spanish civil war, although Stoltzfus’s observation that “Malraux’s characters are flattened out, as in modern painting” (123) may be challenged by a fuller consider- ation of a characters like Manuel, the leader who must undergo profound personal changes in order to command ee ff ctively. Following a consideration of Proustian themes in Across

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

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