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Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army (review)

Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army (review) Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army. By Steven J. Ramold. (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010. Pp. 493. Cloth, $40.00.) Historians of Civil War soldiers have often touched on the issue of dis- cipline, or the lack thereof, in the ranks. Bell Wiley addressed it in sev- eral chapters of The Life of Billy Yank: The Common Soldier of the Union (1952) and The Life of Johnny Reb: The Common Soldier of the Confederacy (1943), as did veteran John D. Billings in Hard Tack and Coff ee: Soldier’s Life in the Civil War (1888). Robert Utley and Edward M. Coff man exam- ined the issue in their broader studies of the U.S. Army, but no one has granted it the sustained attention that Steven J. Ramold has in Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army. Ramold explains that there are two defi nitions of discipline. One relates to combat effi ciency, but the focus of this work is the other, which involves the “willingness to obey orders, subordinate oneself to military practice and custom, and accommodate the needs of the group over the wishes of the individual” (3). The inevitable challenge during the Civil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (2) – Jun 3, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army. By Steven J. Ramold. (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010. Pp. 493. Cloth, $40.00.) Historians of Civil War soldiers have often touched on the issue of dis- cipline, or the lack thereof, in the ranks. Bell Wiley addressed it in sev- eral chapters of The Life of Billy Yank: The Common Soldier of the Union (1952) and The Life of Johnny Reb: The Common Soldier of the Confederacy (1943), as did veteran John D. Billings in Hard Tack and Coff ee: Soldier’s Life in the Civil War (1888). Robert Utley and Edward M. Coff man exam- ined the issue in their broader studies of the U.S. Army, but no one has granted it the sustained attention that Steven J. Ramold has in Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army. Ramold explains that there are two defi nitions of discipline. One relates to combat effi ciency, but the focus of this work is the other, which involves the “willingness to obey orders, subordinate oneself to military practice and custom, and accommodate the needs of the group over the wishes of the individual” (3). The inevitable challenge during the Civil

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2011

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