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Barbary(an) Invasions: The North African Figure in Republican Print Culture

Barbary(an) Invasions: The North African Figure in Republican Print Culture jacob crane Bentley University Barbary(an) Invasions The North African Figure in Republican Print Culture WE, the subjects of the United States of America, having the misfortune to be taken by the Algerines and brought into this port, and made slaves of, being stripped of every one of our clothes, and left in a state of slavery and misery, the severities of which are beyond your imagination, [we hope] you will take our grievances into consideration. . . . Americans, beware! Let nothing tempt you to come in the way of these people, for they are worse than you can imagine. Public letter from three captive American captains in Algiers to the American consul at Cadiz, 1785 two algerine gentlemen "GLORIOUS NEWS!!" announces an issue of the Impartial Herald of Newburyport, Massachusetts, on August 30, 1794. Citing European newspapers just arrived from Rotterdam on the ship Mary, the Herald reports on French advances in Belgium, detailing months-old battles across northern Europe. Yet the Mary brought more to Newburyport than just belated news from a war on the far side of the Atlantic; near the bottom of this tightly packed column of newsprint appears a brief mention of two conspicuous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Barbary(an) Invasions: The North African Figure in Republican Print Culture

Early American Literature , Volume 50 (2) – Jun 21, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
Publisher site
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Abstract

jacob crane Bentley University Barbary(an) Invasions The North African Figure in Republican Print Culture WE, the subjects of the United States of America, having the misfortune to be taken by the Algerines and brought into this port, and made slaves of, being stripped of every one of our clothes, and left in a state of slavery and misery, the severities of which are beyond your imagination, [we hope] you will take our grievances into consideration. . . . Americans, beware! Let nothing tempt you to come in the way of these people, for they are worse than you can imagine. Public letter from three captive American captains in Algiers to the American consul at Cadiz, 1785 two algerine gentlemen "GLORIOUS NEWS!!" announces an issue of the Impartial Herald of Newburyport, Massachusetts, on August 30, 1794. Citing European newspapers just arrived from Rotterdam on the ship Mary, the Herald reports on French advances in Belgium, detailing months-old battles across northern Europe. Yet the Mary brought more to Newburyport than just belated news from a war on the far side of the Atlantic; near the bottom of this tightly packed column of newsprint appears a brief mention of two conspicuous

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 21, 2015

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