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Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy by Michael E. Woods (review)

Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy... Given the scholarly attention paid to the domestic slave trade over the last two decades, some topics Forret covers will be familiar to readers well versed in the field. His emphasis on the Yellow House’s political salience, for example, offers a concrete example of themes descried in other contexts by Robert Gudmestad’s A Troublesome Commerce: The Transformation of the Interstate Slave Trade (2003) and David Lightner’s Slavery and the Commerce Power: How the Struggle against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War (2006). Williams’ Gang nevertheless offers a fresh, impec - cably researched look at critically understudied aspects of slave commerce, particularly the signal importance of governments at the local, state, and national levels in promoting (or permitting) the trade. It also skillfully points out through lines in African Americans’ carceral experiences in the United States without overextending its evidentiary base. Forret’s meticu- lous research, powerful narration, and mastery of the literature, moreover, mean that even students of slave commerce will find much that is new to them in addition to a highly useful case study of the slave trade in action. The range of topics encompassed by this single story also make it a useful guide http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy by Michael E. Woods (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (1) – Feb 24, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Given the scholarly attention paid to the domestic slave trade over the last two decades, some topics Forret covers will be familiar to readers well versed in the field. His emphasis on the Yellow House’s political salience, for example, offers a concrete example of themes descried in other contexts by Robert Gudmestad’s A Troublesome Commerce: The Transformation of the Interstate Slave Trade (2003) and David Lightner’s Slavery and the Commerce Power: How the Struggle against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War (2006). Williams’ Gang nevertheless offers a fresh, impec - cably researched look at critically understudied aspects of slave commerce, particularly the signal importance of governments at the local, state, and national levels in promoting (or permitting) the trade. It also skillfully points out through lines in African Americans’ carceral experiences in the United States without overextending its evidentiary base. Forret’s meticu- lous research, powerful narration, and mastery of the literature, moreover, mean that even students of slave commerce will find much that is new to them in addition to a highly useful case study of the slave trade in action. The range of topics encompassed by this single story also make it a useful guide

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 24, 2021

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