An Ironic Jim Crow: The Experiences of Two Generations of Southern Black Men

An Ironic Jim Crow: The Experiences of Two Generations of Southern Black Men Southern Voices An Ironic Jim Crow The Experiences of Two Generations of Southern Black Men B Y A N G E LA H O R N S B Y A N D M O L LY P. RO Z U M As the manager of the DKE fraternity house located on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Edwin Caldwell Sr. (front row, left) became an influential cultural "broker" between the black and white worlds of segregated Chapel Hill. He also was the first of four generations of Edwin Caldwells. Courtesy of Edwin Caldwell Jr. " They did not knuckle under to the institution of slavery or, following that, the institution of Jim Crow-ism," reflected Edwin Caldwell Jr. on evaluating some two hundred years of his family's history in North Carolina. Descended from November Caldwell, coachman and slave of the first president of the University of North Carolina, the Caldwell family has been entwined with the cultural "ways of the South" through more than five generations. Caldwell's great grandfather opened the first school for African Americans in Chapel Hill in 1868, and the family is rich in educators, doctors, and scientists. For most of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

An Ironic Jim Crow: The Experiences of Two Generations of Southern Black Men

Southern Cultures, Volume 8 (3) – Aug 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Southern Voices An Ironic Jim Crow The Experiences of Two Generations of Southern Black Men B Y A N G E LA H O R N S B Y A N D M O L LY P. RO Z U M As the manager of the DKE fraternity house located on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Edwin Caldwell Sr. (front row, left) became an influential cultural "broker" between the black and white worlds of segregated Chapel Hill. He also was the first of four generations of Edwin Caldwells. Courtesy of Edwin Caldwell Jr. " They did not knuckle under to the institution of slavery or, following that, the institution of Jim Crow-ism," reflected Edwin Caldwell Jr. on evaluating some two hundred years of his family's history in North Carolina. Descended from November Caldwell, coachman and slave of the first president of the University of North Carolina, the Caldwell family has been entwined with the cultural "ways of the South" through more than five generations. Caldwell's great grandfather opened the first school for African Americans in Chapel Hill in 1868, and the family is rich in educators, doctors, and scientists. For most of

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 1, 2002

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