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An Environmental History of the Civil War by Judkin Browning and Timothy Silver (review)

An Environmental History of the Civil War by Judkin Browning and Timothy Silver (review) Urban historians and scholars of capitalism will be most interested in these insights, and the book would be a welcome addition to any research- based graduate seminar as a model for how to wrestle with municipal records. However, students and other scholars will also need to wrestle with the absence of many urban residents from these pages; Ryan largely sidelines African Americans and women because they did not obtain suf- frage until after her study concludes and rarely controlled property. Thus, Ryan contends, “they were denied the most basic political tools necessary for taking land and shaping cities” (366). While these residents may have lacked the political tools that left trails in municipal documents and land deeds, they certainly were part of the urban public and participated in many of the same events and actions that made the two cities. For scholars of the Civil War era, the fourth part of the book will be most interesting, as it considers the Civil War from the vantage point of the two cities. Ryan finds that local concerns about landownership and city growth were often more pressing than the war. In some ways, this is unsurpris- ing—local events always dominate local http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

An Environmental History of the Civil War by Judkin Browning and Timothy Silver (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (1) – Feb 24, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Urban historians and scholars of capitalism will be most interested in these insights, and the book would be a welcome addition to any research- based graduate seminar as a model for how to wrestle with municipal records. However, students and other scholars will also need to wrestle with the absence of many urban residents from these pages; Ryan largely sidelines African Americans and women because they did not obtain suf- frage until after her study concludes and rarely controlled property. Thus, Ryan contends, “they were denied the most basic political tools necessary for taking land and shaping cities” (366). While these residents may have lacked the political tools that left trails in municipal documents and land deeds, they certainly were part of the urban public and participated in many of the same events and actions that made the two cities. For scholars of the Civil War era, the fourth part of the book will be most interesting, as it considers the Civil War from the vantage point of the two cities. Ryan finds that local concerns about landownership and city growth were often more pressing than the war. In some ways, this is unsurpris- ing—local events always dominate local

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 24, 2021

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