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American Homicide (review)

American Homicide (review) slavery. Clavin argues that his focus on the Civil War era of the United States undermines this claim, but I am not so sure. Slavery expanded enormously in the decades after the Haitian Revolution in the United States, Cuba, and Brazil in what Dale Tomich has called the "second slavery." Expanding Atlantic markets for staples produced by slaves provided the economic impetus for the expansion of slavery, and in the nascent struggle between slaveholders and abolitionists in Great Britain and the United States, the Haitian Revolution clearly tipped the scales in favor of the slaveholders, especially in the United States. The argument that the Haitian Revolution had emancipatory effects beyond the shoreline of Hispaniola loses its potency when we remember that enslaved people in the British West Indies had to wait thirty years for abolition, and in the French Caribbean they waited forty-four. African Americans born enslaved had to wait sixty years, and black slaves in Cuba and Brazil waited more than eighty. Despite this critique, Clavin's book should be read by all those who wish to deepen their understanding of the international dimensions of the American Civil War. edward bartlett rugemer edward bartlett rugemer is assistant professor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

slavery. Clavin argues that his focus on the Civil War era of the United States undermines this claim, but I am not so sure. Slavery expanded enormously in the decades after the Haitian Revolution in the United States, Cuba, and Brazil in what Dale Tomich has called the "second slavery." Expanding Atlantic markets for staples produced by slaves provided the economic impetus for the expansion of slavery, and in the nascent struggle between slaveholders and abolitionists in Great Britain and the United States, the Haitian Revolution clearly tipped the scales in favor of the slaveholders, especially in the United States. The argument that the Haitian Revolution had emancipatory effects beyond the shoreline of Hispaniola loses its potency when we remember that enslaved people in the British West Indies had to wait thirty years for abolition, and in the French Caribbean they waited forty-four. African Americans born enslaved had to wait sixty years, and black slaves in Cuba and Brazil waited more than eighty. Despite this critique, Clavin's book should be read by all those who wish to deepen their understanding of the international dimensions of the American Civil War. edward bartlett rugemer edward bartlett rugemer is assistant professor

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2011

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