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American Abolitionism: Its Direct Political Impact from Colonial Times into Reconstruction by Stanley Harrold (review)

American Abolitionism: Its Direct Political Impact from Colonial Times into Reconstruction by... colonial and genocidal aims in both the short and long term by transform- ing Indigenous lands into private property and legally eliminating commu- nities’ sovereignty and Indigeneity. Overall, Surviving Genocide provides a valuable synthesis of American settler colonialism and Indigenous responses to it. Its uncompromising as- sessment of genocide is a timely and important intervention. In the sum- mer of 2019, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights and the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls publicly acknowledged a long-ranging history of genocide against Indigenous people in North America, following the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Com- mission’s 2015 acknowledgement of “cultural genocide.” To date, there has not been a similar reckoning in the United States. Though Ostler concedes that “at the time of this writing, it hardly seems likely that the federal gov- ernment will establish a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to honestly assess the United States’ impact on Native nations and propose meaningful remedies” (8), his study lays important groundwork to open a new debate about this difficult element of the American past. Whether the debate un - folds in journals, classrooms, or newspaper columns, Surviving Genocide will provide mandatory reading for all participants in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

American Abolitionism: Its Direct Political Impact from Colonial Times into Reconstruction by Stanley Harrold (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (3) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

colonial and genocidal aims in both the short and long term by transform- ing Indigenous lands into private property and legally eliminating commu- nities’ sovereignty and Indigeneity. Overall, Surviving Genocide provides a valuable synthesis of American settler colonialism and Indigenous responses to it. Its uncompromising as- sessment of genocide is a timely and important intervention. In the sum- mer of 2019, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights and the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls publicly acknowledged a long-ranging history of genocide against Indigenous people in North America, following the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Com- mission’s 2015 acknowledgement of “cultural genocide.” To date, there has not been a similar reckoning in the United States. Though Ostler concedes that “at the time of this writing, it hardly seems likely that the federal gov- ernment will establish a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to honestly assess the United States’ impact on Native nations and propose meaningful remedies” (8), his study lays important groundwork to open a new debate about this difficult element of the American past. Whether the debate un - folds in journals, classrooms, or newspaper columns, Surviving Genocide will provide mandatory reading for all participants in

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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