“All Parts of the Union I Considered My Home”: The Federal Imagination of The Algerine Captive

“All Parts of the Union I Considered My Home”: The Federal Imagination of The Algerine Captive keri holt Utah State University "All Parts of the Union I Considered My Home" The Federal Imagination of The Algerine Captive My ardent wish is that my fellow citizens may profit by my misfortunes. If they peruse these pages with attention they will perceive the necessity of uniting our federal strength to enforce a due respect among other nations. Let us, one and all, endeavor to sustain the general government. . . . Our first object is union among ourselves. For to no nation besides the United States can that antient saying be more emphatically applied: BY UNITING WE STAND, BY DIVIDING WE FALL. --Royall Tyler, The Algerine Captive (1797) Toward the middle of Royall Tyler's The Algerine Captive, an unusual exchange takes place. Having been captured and bound into slavery in Algiers, Updike Underhill--the novel's wayward Yankee protagonist-- agrees to meet with a "Mahometan priest" who wishes to debate matters of faith. At first glance, the stage seems set for a conflict between East and West. Underhill enters the room with confidence, ready to defend "the sacred truths of our holy religion against the insidious attack of the mussulman priest" (131). The Mollah greets him with equal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

“All Parts of the Union I Considered My Home”: The Federal Imagination of The Algerine Captive

Early American Literature, Volume 46 (3) – Nov 10, 2011

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
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1534-147X
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Abstract

keri holt Utah State University "All Parts of the Union I Considered My Home" The Federal Imagination of The Algerine Captive My ardent wish is that my fellow citizens may profit by my misfortunes. If they peruse these pages with attention they will perceive the necessity of uniting our federal strength to enforce a due respect among other nations. Let us, one and all, endeavor to sustain the general government. . . . Our first object is union among ourselves. For to no nation besides the United States can that antient saying be more emphatically applied: BY UNITING WE STAND, BY DIVIDING WE FALL. --Royall Tyler, The Algerine Captive (1797) Toward the middle of Royall Tyler's The Algerine Captive, an unusual exchange takes place. Having been captured and bound into slavery in Algiers, Updike Underhill--the novel's wayward Yankee protagonist-- agrees to meet with a "Mahometan priest" who wishes to debate matters of faith. At first glance, the stage seems set for a conflict between East and West. Underhill enters the room with confidence, ready to defend "the sacred truths of our holy religion against the insidious attack of the mussulman priest" (131). The Mollah greets him with equal

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 10, 2011

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