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All Out of Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality (review)

All Out of Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality (review) tutions that have made America what it is today. For Hitchens, Jefferson is "one of the few figures in our history whose absence simply cannot be imagined." This is a short book--too short to flesh out its many fascinating (and sometimes startling) suggestions. Hitchens isn't altogether comfortable in the early American republic, and this leads to several minor errors of fact (which are all the more grating encased in Hitchens' knowing, laconic style). But he makes up for these with the fresh perspective he does bring to the period. And it is this perspective that, in the end, forces the book upon our attention. For Hitchens, whether he fully realizes it, has given us, not the "Dixiecrat avant la lettre" we've become accustomed to seeing from the professional historians, but a nation-builder--a Jefferson who presided over a revolution and the formation of a nation that he spent the remainder of his political life trying to save. Perhaps, in the end, Jefferson was as concerned with saving the union as Lincoln, who presided over another revolution, this one designed to make that nation "forever worthy of the saving." For this suggestion alone, Hitchens' book demands an audience. All Out http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

All Out of Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 14 (1) – Feb 13, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

tutions that have made America what it is today. For Hitchens, Jefferson is "one of the few figures in our history whose absence simply cannot be imagined." This is a short book--too short to flesh out its many fascinating (and sometimes startling) suggestions. Hitchens isn't altogether comfortable in the early American republic, and this leads to several minor errors of fact (which are all the more grating encased in Hitchens' knowing, laconic style). But he makes up for these with the fresh perspective he does bring to the period. And it is this perspective that, in the end, forces the book upon our attention. For Hitchens, whether he fully realizes it, has given us, not the "Dixiecrat avant la lettre" we've become accustomed to seeing from the professional historians, but a nation-builder--a Jefferson who presided over a revolution and the formation of a nation that he spent the remainder of his political life trying to save. Perhaps, in the end, Jefferson was as concerned with saving the union as Lincoln, who presided over another revolution, this one designed to make that nation "forever worthy of the saving." For this suggestion alone, Hitchens' book demands an audience. All Out

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2008

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