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Alan Lomax: The Long Journey

Alan Lomax: The Long Journey Not Forgotten Alan Lomax The Long Journey by william r. ferris How can we wrap our arms around Alan Lomax? His love for music and for poets like Carl Sandburg is reflected in the prose style of his writings on music and dance. Scorning what he called "chair-bound scholars," he pursued an unending journey in search of the truth and beauty that he found in folksong and dance. Alan Lomax, on stage at the Mountain Music Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, 1940, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. This essay was first presented as an address in January 2006 at a conference titled "The Lomax Legacy: Folklore in a Globalizing Century," sponsored by the American Folklife Center and the Association for Cultural Equity, New York, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. How can we wrap our arms around Alan Lomax? He was a force of nature who appeared superhuman. I thought of Alan as a Minotaur -- half man, half supernatural -- who defied life as we know it. His very walk seemed to defy gravity as he slid gracefully with his distinctive gait. Sally Yerkovich recalls seeing Alan one day at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Alan Lomax: The Long Journey

Southern Cultures , Volume 13 (3) – Sep 17, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Not Forgotten Alan Lomax The Long Journey by william r. ferris How can we wrap our arms around Alan Lomax? His love for music and for poets like Carl Sandburg is reflected in the prose style of his writings on music and dance. Scorning what he called "chair-bound scholars," he pursued an unending journey in search of the truth and beauty that he found in folksong and dance. Alan Lomax, on stage at the Mountain Music Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, 1940, courtesy of the Collections of the Library of Congress. This essay was first presented as an address in January 2006 at a conference titled "The Lomax Legacy: Folklore in a Globalizing Century," sponsored by the American Folklife Center and the Association for Cultural Equity, New York, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. How can we wrap our arms around Alan Lomax? He was a force of nature who appeared superhuman. I thought of Alan as a Minotaur -- half man, half supernatural -- who defied life as we know it. His very walk seemed to defy gravity as he slid gracefully with his distinctive gait. Sally Yerkovich recalls seeing Alan one day at the

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 17, 2007

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