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Agonistic Academe: Dialogue, Paralogy, and the Postmodern University

Agonistic Academe: Dialogue, Paralogy, and the Postmodern University Jeffrey r. Di leo Agonistic Academe Dialogue, Paralogy, and the Postmodern University The birth of the neoliberal university might be traced back to 1996, when a relatively unknown associate professor of Comparative Literature at the Université de Montréal caused a stir by publishing a book that showed how colleges and universities are run more like businesses or corporations than educational institutions. Widely read and cited, Bill Readings' The University in Ruins (1996) was a shot across the bow of academe. It announced that business values were supplanting academic values in the administration of universities--and laid the groundwork for a chorus of ever more dystopic political and economic accounts of the state of higher education. Readings' book was highly influential and convinced a lot of folks whose primary area of research was not higher education to start thinking and writing about the corporate conditions of academe. Over the course of the next dozen years (1996­ 2008), many other fine accounts of the corporate logic of the contemporary university and its implications came out including CUNY sociologist Stanley Aronowitz's The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning (2001), former Harvard President Derek Bok's Universities in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Agonistic Academe: Dialogue, Paralogy, and the Postmodern University

The Comparatist , Volume 37 (1) – May 12, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jeffrey r. Di leo Agonistic Academe Dialogue, Paralogy, and the Postmodern University The birth of the neoliberal university might be traced back to 1996, when a relatively unknown associate professor of Comparative Literature at the Université de Montréal caused a stir by publishing a book that showed how colleges and universities are run more like businesses or corporations than educational institutions. Widely read and cited, Bill Readings' The University in Ruins (1996) was a shot across the bow of academe. It announced that business values were supplanting academic values in the administration of universities--and laid the groundwork for a chorus of ever more dystopic political and economic accounts of the state of higher education. Readings' book was highly influential and convinced a lot of folks whose primary area of research was not higher education to start thinking and writing about the corporate conditions of academe. Over the course of the next dozen years (1996­ 2008), many other fine accounts of the corporate logic of the contemporary university and its implications came out including CUNY sociologist Stanley Aronowitz's The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning (2001), former Harvard President Derek Bok's Universities in the

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 12, 2013

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