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A View from My Balcony: Perspectives on Comparative Literature in 1995

A View from My Balcony: Perspectives on Comparative Literature in 1995 A VIEW FROM MY BALCONY: PERSPECTIVES ON Jean-Pierre Barricelli As a member of the second generation of American comparatists, following that of, among others, Friedrich and Frenz, PoggioU and WeUek, Clements and Levin, Balakian and Aldridge, Remak and Bloch, and therefore stAl--God knows--a pioneer in the '50s and '60s, I find myself in the self-contradictory situation of having to attempt a definition of when I reaUy do not want one. For when I came into academic being long after the '20s, the decade usuaUy attributed to the rise of comparatism, I remember admiring the historical example of Goethe's Uterary cosmopoUtanism two centuries ago, and its more recent appUcation by FarineUi at the outset of our century. Expanding on this background, I beUeved firmly, over 40 years ago when I received my doctorate, that the energy and attractiveness, excitement and seduction, value and beauty of what I had studied and was preparing to teach lay in its open undefinabAity, in its rejection of national boundaries, in its embracing not only of belles lettres in the most international sense of the expression, but also of ars humanitatis in the broadest, including interdiscipUnary, sense of the concept. Because--so I thought--A the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

A View from My Balcony: Perspectives on Comparative Literature in 1995

The Comparatist , Volume 20 (1) – Oct 3, 1996

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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1559-0887
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Abstract

A VIEW FROM MY BALCONY: PERSPECTIVES ON Jean-Pierre Barricelli As a member of the second generation of American comparatists, following that of, among others, Friedrich and Frenz, PoggioU and WeUek, Clements and Levin, Balakian and Aldridge, Remak and Bloch, and therefore stAl--God knows--a pioneer in the '50s and '60s, I find myself in the self-contradictory situation of having to attempt a definition of when I reaUy do not want one. For when I came into academic being long after the '20s, the decade usuaUy attributed to the rise of comparatism, I remember admiring the historical example of Goethe's Uterary cosmopoUtanism two centuries ago, and its more recent appUcation by FarineUi at the outset of our century. Expanding on this background, I beUeved firmly, over 40 years ago when I received my doctorate, that the energy and attractiveness, excitement and seduction, value and beauty of what I had studied and was preparing to teach lay in its open undefinabAity, in its rejection of national boundaries, in its embracing not only of belles lettres in the most international sense of the expression, but also of ars humanitatis in the broadest, including interdiscipUnary, sense of the concept. Because--so I thought--A the

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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