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A Typology of Parental Involvement in Student Experience: A Latent Class Analysis

A Typology of Parental Involvement in Student Experience: A Latent Class Analysis <p>Abstract:</p><p>We examine the extent to which there are significantly different types of Parental Involvement in student’s high school experience, and what the relationship of these different types may be to long-term student outcomes, such as high school graduation, college going, and specifically for this study, STEM career outcomes. With the dataset the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) which includes 11,727 parents of high school students in the United States, we examine how parents interact with students and schools using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). We identify three significantly different subgroups of parent involvement: <i>Guiding</i> (44.2%), <i>Lenient</i> (22.3%), and <i>Advocate</i> (33.5%). Parental context and demographic factors, such as gender and ethnicity, and school variables, such as private status and school size, are significantly associated with membership across subgroups, which in turn are related to students’ education outcomes, such as college enrollment and selection of a STEM career versus other career outcomes.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

A Typology of Parental Involvement in Student Experience: A Latent Class Analysis

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (2) – Aug 6, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>We examine the extent to which there are significantly different types of Parental Involvement in student’s high school experience, and what the relationship of these different types may be to long-term student outcomes, such as high school graduation, college going, and specifically for this study, STEM career outcomes. With the dataset the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) which includes 11,727 parents of high school students in the United States, we examine how parents interact with students and schools using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). We identify three significantly different subgroups of parent involvement: <i>Guiding</i> (44.2%), <i>Lenient</i> (22.3%), and <i>Advocate</i> (33.5%). Parental context and demographic factors, such as gender and ethnicity, and school variables, such as private status and school size, are significantly associated with membership across subgroups, which in turn are related to students’ education outcomes, such as college enrollment and selection of a STEM career versus other career outcomes.</p>

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 6, 2020

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