Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Transnational Poetics (review)

A Transnational Poetics (review) cultural space for China and express ambiguous sentiments regarding contem- porary life. e Th i mpact China’s recent history has had upon the reception and assimilation of Shakespeare resounds throughout this work. Of note is Huang’s quiet aside con- cerning the impact had by the Cultural Revolution. He observes that rather than being performed publicly, Shakespeare was at this time read and experienced in a solitary manner by those imprisoned in labor camps. In evaluating the highly per- sonalized performance styles that developed following the opening of China in the 1980s, Huang lightly traces the impact wielded by that type of reading, which allowed personal experience to be “politicized and aestheticized” (9). However, he focuses more signic fi antly upon the inu fl ence that exposure to market forces and a global vernacular now wield upon recent production styles. His discussions of such productions, which privilege the individual voice over the collective, stand out among his analyses for their provocative reading of the contemporary use of religious imagery and multiple regional dialects, and the place of the visual image in global culture. A detailed and absorbing chronology of international, as well as specic fi ally Chinese Shakespearean performances, follows http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

A Transnational Poetics (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/a-transnational-poetics-review-djqdT4CPDB
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

cultural space for China and express ambiguous sentiments regarding contem- porary life. e Th i mpact China’s recent history has had upon the reception and assimilation of Shakespeare resounds throughout this work. Of note is Huang’s quiet aside con- cerning the impact had by the Cultural Revolution. He observes that rather than being performed publicly, Shakespeare was at this time read and experienced in a solitary manner by those imprisoned in labor camps. In evaluating the highly per- sonalized performance styles that developed following the opening of China in the 1980s, Huang lightly traces the impact wielded by that type of reading, which allowed personal experience to be “politicized and aestheticized” (9). However, he focuses more signic fi antly upon the inu fl ence that exposure to market forces and a global vernacular now wield upon recent production styles. His discussions of such productions, which privilege the individual voice over the collective, stand out among his analyses for their provocative reading of the contemporary use of religious imagery and multiple regional dialects, and the place of the visual image in global culture. A detailed and absorbing chronology of international, as well as specic fi ally Chinese Shakespearean performances, follows

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

There are no references for this article.