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A Tour of Reconstruction: Travel Letters of 1875 by Anna Dickinson (review)

A Tour of Reconstruction: Travel Letters of 1875 by Anna Dickinson (review) college-level history exclusively online and regularly posts to his blog, Civil War Emancipation, at http://cwemancipation.wordpress.com. A Tour of Reconstruction: Travel Letters of 1875. By Anna Dickinson. Edited by J. Matthew Gallman. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2011. Pp. 188. Cloth, $35.00.) The South was invaded many times during the mid-nineteenth century by northern travel writers. Frederick Law Olmsted was the most influential in the antebellum period, contending in A Journey in the Seaboard Slave States (1856) that slavery negatively affected southern society. Immediately after the Civil War in 1866 northerners such as Carl Schurz and Horace White published reports on how to help African Americans and quickly reconstruct the South. Less than a decade later northerner James Pike argued for the end of Reconstruction in The Prostrate State: South Carolina under Negro Government (1874). Few of these writers, though, could compare with Anna Dickinson, whose keen eye and sharp pen analyzed such topics as Reconstruction, the legacy of the Civil War, and race relations in her 1875 travel letters. Dickinson was one of the most famous women in America during the Civil War era. Born in Philadelphia in 1842 and raised as a Quaker, she started giving public http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

A Tour of Reconstruction: Travel Letters of 1875 by Anna Dickinson (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 3 (1) – Feb 13, 2013

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

college-level history exclusively online and regularly posts to his blog, Civil War Emancipation, at http://cwemancipation.wordpress.com. A Tour of Reconstruction: Travel Letters of 1875. By Anna Dickinson. Edited by J. Matthew Gallman. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2011. Pp. 188. Cloth, $35.00.) The South was invaded many times during the mid-nineteenth century by northern travel writers. Frederick Law Olmsted was the most influential in the antebellum period, contending in A Journey in the Seaboard Slave States (1856) that slavery negatively affected southern society. Immediately after the Civil War in 1866 northerners such as Carl Schurz and Horace White published reports on how to help African Americans and quickly reconstruct the South. Less than a decade later northerner James Pike argued for the end of Reconstruction in The Prostrate State: South Carolina under Negro Government (1874). Few of these writers, though, could compare with Anna Dickinson, whose keen eye and sharp pen analyzed such topics as Reconstruction, the legacy of the Civil War, and race relations in her 1875 travel letters. Dickinson was one of the most famous women in America during the Civil War era. Born in Philadelphia in 1842 and raised as a Quaker, she started giving public

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2013

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