A Spatial Analysis of Urban Population Distribution in Raleigh, North Carolina

A Spatial Analysis of Urban Population Distribution in Raleigh, North Carolina A Spatial Analysis of Urban Population Distribution in Raleigh, North Carolina Chittaranjan Pathak Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Raleigh is the easternmost city of the so-called "Piedmont Crescent," a string of small- to medium-size cities along a semi-circular course extending westward from Raleigh through Greensboro, Charlotte, and into South and federal highways, are spreading along the transportation lines--as well as laterally--with a tendency to form a continuous chain of urban development (Fig. 1). Another distinctive feature of the Crescent is the absence of one dominant metropolis. Among the North Carolina cities involved, the largest was Charlotte with a 1960 population of 201,564, followed by Greensboro with 119,574, Winston-Salem with 111,134, and Raleigh with 93,931. Carolina. These cities, interconnected by railroads and by state, interstate Within this Crescent context, Raleigh has experienced a distinct growth pattern. It is the capital of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County. This political-administrative function brought Raleigh economic stability and, originally, a slow but steady growth in population and physical size. The distribution of population in Raleigh was simple and compact prior to this century, with a much smaller area size and a lower population. Even until very recently population density changes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeastern Geographer University of North Carolina Press

A Spatial Analysis of Urban Population Distribution in Raleigh, North Carolina

Southeastern Geographer, Volume 4 (1) – Jul 3, 1964

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Southeastern Division, Association of American Geographers.
ISSN
1549-6929
Publisher site
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Abstract

A Spatial Analysis of Urban Population Distribution in Raleigh, North Carolina Chittaranjan Pathak Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Raleigh is the easternmost city of the so-called "Piedmont Crescent," a string of small- to medium-size cities along a semi-circular course extending westward from Raleigh through Greensboro, Charlotte, and into South and federal highways, are spreading along the transportation lines--as well as laterally--with a tendency to form a continuous chain of urban development (Fig. 1). Another distinctive feature of the Crescent is the absence of one dominant metropolis. Among the North Carolina cities involved, the largest was Charlotte with a 1960 population of 201,564, followed by Greensboro with 119,574, Winston-Salem with 111,134, and Raleigh with 93,931. Carolina. These cities, interconnected by railroads and by state, interstate Within this Crescent context, Raleigh has experienced a distinct growth pattern. It is the capital of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County. This political-administrative function brought Raleigh economic stability and, originally, a slow but steady growth in population and physical size. The distribution of population in Raleigh was simple and compact prior to this century, with a much smaller area size and a lower population. Even until very recently population density changes

Journal

Southeastern GeographerUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 3, 1964

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