Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Socialist Utopia in the New South The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (review)

A Socialist Utopia in the New South The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (review) of hand wringing and complaint. The argument in favor of this approach was and is that the only way to teU the story of slave women -- clearly the story that most needs telling-- is to teU it as a story that first recognizes the difference based on race and class. But is there somewhere to go after we have turned the race and class tables, after we have deconstructed white women's claims to valor and con- structed black women's claims to the same? Again Glymph's essay points the way, in her focus on African American women's contribution as women, as the mothers of their chüdren, the wives of their husbands, die caretakers of their famUies. Here Joan Cashin's essay, "Into the Trackless WUderness: The Refugee Experience in the CivU War," picks up this theme and thereby points the way for the study of Confederate women as weU. It opens witii the story of a refugee Confederate woman burying her two chUdren in an unmarked grave at the side of die road, not unHke the way Glymph's essay closes with freedwomen's experience of having their chüdren swept down river and drowned as they attempted to foUow Sherman's March http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

A Socialist Utopia in the New South The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (1) – Jan 4, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/a-socialist-utopia-in-the-new-south-the-ruskin-colonies-in-tennessee-dD2lrif0qi
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

of hand wringing and complaint. The argument in favor of this approach was and is that the only way to teU the story of slave women -- clearly the story that most needs telling-- is to teU it as a story that first recognizes the difference based on race and class. But is there somewhere to go after we have turned the race and class tables, after we have deconstructed white women's claims to valor and con- structed black women's claims to the same? Again Glymph's essay points the way, in her focus on African American women's contribution as women, as the mothers of their chüdren, the wives of their husbands, die caretakers of their famUies. Here Joan Cashin's essay, "Into the Trackless WUderness: The Refugee Experience in the CivU War," picks up this theme and thereby points the way for the study of Confederate women as weU. It opens witii the story of a refugee Confederate woman burying her two chUdren in an unmarked grave at the side of die road, not unHke the way Glymph's essay closes with freedwomen's experience of having their chüdren swept down river and drowned as they attempted to foUow Sherman's March

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

There are no references for this article.