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"A Self-Inflicted Wound": The Impact of Coastal Erosion and Restoration on Louisiana's Oyster Industry

"A Self-Inflicted Wound": The Impact of Coastal Erosion and Restoration on Louisiana's... Essa y .................... “A Self- Inflicted Wound” The Impact of Coastal Erosion and Restoration on Louisiana’s Oyster Industry by Rebecca Bond Costa The case of Avenal v. the State of Louisiana drew public attention to the ongoing challenges of protecting natural resources—challenges that governments and communities across the country had been struggling with for decades. Aerial view of Louisiana wetlands, January 19, 2006. This image originates from the National Digital Library of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. 27 n December 2000, a jury in Plaquemines Parish awarded $48 mil - lion to v fi e Louisiana oyster fishers. By filing suit against the state, Albert J. Avenal, Kenneth Fox, Clarence Duplessis, Nick Skansi, and Fox Oyster Company drew public attention to the  I ongoing challenges of protecting natural resour c hall ces— enges that governments and communities across the country had been struggling with for decades. In fact, oyster sh fi ers on the East Coast had seen 99 percent of Chesa- peake Bay oysters disappear since the nineteenth century because of overshing fi and disease. In 2005, the problem had become so grave that an environmental con - sultant in Maryland http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

"A Self-Inflicted Wound": The Impact of Coastal Erosion and Restoration on Louisiana's Oyster Industry

Southern Cultures , Volume 24 (1) – Apr 7, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

Essa y .................... “A Self- Inflicted Wound” The Impact of Coastal Erosion and Restoration on Louisiana’s Oyster Industry by Rebecca Bond Costa The case of Avenal v. the State of Louisiana drew public attention to the ongoing challenges of protecting natural resources—challenges that governments and communities across the country had been struggling with for decades. Aerial view of Louisiana wetlands, January 19, 2006. This image originates from the National Digital Library of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. 27 n December 2000, a jury in Plaquemines Parish awarded $48 mil - lion to v fi e Louisiana oyster fishers. By filing suit against the state, Albert J. Avenal, Kenneth Fox, Clarence Duplessis, Nick Skansi, and Fox Oyster Company drew public attention to the  I ongoing challenges of protecting natural resour c hall ces— enges that governments and communities across the country had been struggling with for decades. In fact, oyster sh fi ers on the East Coast had seen 99 percent of Chesa- peake Bay oysters disappear since the nineteenth century because of overshing fi and disease. In 2005, the problem had become so grave that an environmental con - sultant in Maryland

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Apr 7, 2018

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