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A Preliminary Investigation of Academic Disidentification, Racial Identity, and Academic Achievement Among African American Adolescents

A Preliminary Investigation of Academic Disidentification, Racial Identity, and Academic... Kevin Cokley, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin kevin.cokley@mail.utexas.edu Shannon McClain University of Texas at Austin mcclainse@gmail.com Martinique Jones University of Houston Mkjones2@uh.edu Samoan Johnson, Ph.D. University of Texas Medical School Samoan.Johnson@uth.tmc.edu The purpose of this study was to examine academic disidentification along with demographic and psychological factors related to the academic achievement of African American adolescents. Participants included 96 African American students (41 males, 55 females) in an urban high school setting located in the Southwest. Consistent with previous research, academic disidentification was determined by looking for an attenuation of the correlation between academic self-concept and grade point average (GPA) of male and female students. The relationship between academic self-concept and grade point average significantly decreased for African American males, while it significantly increased for African American females. Demographic factors included age and sex, while psychological factors included academic self-concept, devaluing academic success, and racial identity. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that sex and academic self-concept were significant positive predictors of GPA, while age and racial identity were significant negative predictors, accounting for 50% variance. Academic self-concept was the strongest predictor of GPA. Implications of the results are discussed. A Preliminary Examination of Academic Disidentification, Racial http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

A Preliminary Investigation of Academic Disidentification, Racial Identity, and Academic Achievement Among African American Adolescents

The High School Journal , Volume 95 (2) – Dec 16, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin kevin.cokley@mail.utexas.edu Shannon McClain University of Texas at Austin mcclainse@gmail.com Martinique Jones University of Houston Mkjones2@uh.edu Samoan Johnson, Ph.D. University of Texas Medical School Samoan.Johnson@uth.tmc.edu The purpose of this study was to examine academic disidentification along with demographic and psychological factors related to the academic achievement of African American adolescents. Participants included 96 African American students (41 males, 55 females) in an urban high school setting located in the Southwest. Consistent with previous research, academic disidentification was determined by looking for an attenuation of the correlation between academic self-concept and grade point average (GPA) of male and female students. The relationship between academic self-concept and grade point average significantly decreased for African American males, while it significantly increased for African American females. Demographic factors included age and sex, while psychological factors included academic self-concept, devaluing academic success, and racial identity. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that sex and academic self-concept were significant positive predictors of GPA, while age and racial identity were significant negative predictors, accounting for 50% variance. Academic self-concept was the strongest predictor of GPA. Implications of the results are discussed. A Preliminary Examination of Academic Disidentification, Racial

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 16, 2012

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