A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco: The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression

A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco: The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression ESSAY ...................... A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression by Blain Roberts Across the Depression-era South, rural women made creative use of tobacco leaves to compete for a new kind of crown. Wilson Tobacco Festival, June 1938, courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina. n August 1937 the tobacco warehouses in Wilson, North Carolina, opened their doors to area tobacco farmers, just as they had each year since 1895. But that summer there was a new attraction in town--the first ever Wilson Tobacco Queen, a young woman recently crowned to reign over the annual tobacco marketing season. Though beautiful and radiant, the Wilson queen was hardly unique. At the height of the Great Depression, tobacco queens had suddenly become all the rage. Danville, Virginia, had sponsored its first tobacco-queen contest in 1934; South Boston, Virginia, followed in 1935. In the mid to late 1930s, nearly a dozen brightleaf-tobacco market towns in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia inaugurated queen competitions, and a curious new icon of rural white womanhood took root in the agrarian landscape. Across the Brightleaf Belt, tobacco queens ruled. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco: The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression

Southern Cultures, Volume 12 (2) – Oct 5, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/a-new-cure-for-brightleaf-tobacco-the-origins-of-the-tobacco-queen-5Krzg2IKpf
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ESSAY ...................... A New Cure for Brightleaf Tobacco The Origins of the Tobacco Queen during the Great Depression by Blain Roberts Across the Depression-era South, rural women made creative use of tobacco leaves to compete for a new kind of crown. Wilson Tobacco Festival, June 1938, courtesy of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina. n August 1937 the tobacco warehouses in Wilson, North Carolina, opened their doors to area tobacco farmers, just as they had each year since 1895. But that summer there was a new attraction in town--the first ever Wilson Tobacco Queen, a young woman recently crowned to reign over the annual tobacco marketing season. Though beautiful and radiant, the Wilson queen was hardly unique. At the height of the Great Depression, tobacco queens had suddenly become all the rage. Danville, Virginia, had sponsored its first tobacco-queen contest in 1934; South Boston, Virginia, followed in 1935. In the mid to late 1930s, nearly a dozen brightleaf-tobacco market towns in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia inaugurated queen competitions, and a curious new icon of rural white womanhood took root in the agrarian landscape. Across the Brightleaf Belt, tobacco queens ruled.

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 5, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off