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A Changing Wind: Commerce and Conflict in Civil War Atlanta by Wendy Hamand Venet (review)

A Changing Wind: Commerce and Conflict in Civil War Atlanta by Wendy Hamand Venet (review) wesley moody is a professor of history at Florida State College at Jacksonville and is the author of Demon of the Lost Cause: Sherman and Civil War History (University of Missouri Press, 2011). A Changing Wind: Commerce and Conflict in Civil War Atlanta. By Wendy Hamand Venet. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014. Pp. 280. Cloth, $30.00.) Four decades ago, in The Confederacy as a Revolutionary Experience (1971), Emory M. Thomas called attention to the economic, industrial, and symbolic changes that gave southern cities new importance and visibility between 1861 and 1865. During the Confederacy's brief life span, Thomas argues, an "urban revolution" was in fact under way in a region that had gone to war in defense of agrarian values. Prefiguring the New South mentality of the 1880s, the Confederacy's city dwellers exhibited unmistakable signs of an incipient urban identity. At the time Thomas wrote, southern cities had received scant attention from historians. Over the next generation the picture changed markedly as Don H. Doyle and other specialists in urban history gave long overdue attention to the urban dimension of the southern past. Atlanta was a major beneficiary of this new historiographical trend. During the 1970s no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

A Changing Wind: Commerce and Conflict in Civil War Atlanta by Wendy Hamand Venet (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 5 (2) – May 7, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

wesley moody is a professor of history at Florida State College at Jacksonville and is the author of Demon of the Lost Cause: Sherman and Civil War History (University of Missouri Press, 2011). A Changing Wind: Commerce and Conflict in Civil War Atlanta. By Wendy Hamand Venet. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014. Pp. 280. Cloth, $30.00.) Four decades ago, in The Confederacy as a Revolutionary Experience (1971), Emory M. Thomas called attention to the economic, industrial, and symbolic changes that gave southern cities new importance and visibility between 1861 and 1865. During the Confederacy's brief life span, Thomas argues, an "urban revolution" was in fact under way in a region that had gone to war in defense of agrarian values. Prefiguring the New South mentality of the 1880s, the Confederacy's city dwellers exhibited unmistakable signs of an incipient urban identity. At the time Thomas wrote, southern cities had received scant attention from historians. Over the next generation the picture changed markedly as Don H. Doyle and other specialists in urban history gave long overdue attention to the urban dimension of the southern past. Atlanta was a major beneficiary of this new historiographical trend. During the 1970s no

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 7, 2015

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