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Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography (review)

Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography (review) REVIEWS Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography, by Barbara Stefanie Giehmann. Germany: Konigshausen and Neumann, 2011. 455 pp. Cloth, = 49.80. C Barbara Stefanie Giehmann maps out the northern literary landscapes of London and Service in Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography. Giehmann argues that with the closing of the frontier at the end of the nineteenth century, Americans began to view northern territory as the new West; that is, many imagined and idealized the North as a replacement for Western wilderness, which had become increasingly obsolete. Throughout the book, Giehmann distinguishes the north as a physical geography encompassing the Arctic regions of Canada, Russia, and the United States from the Northland as an imaginary untainted terrain standing for imperial dreams, hopes, and visions. Writing the Northland does a fine job of mapping out its mission: by illustrating that London and Service share an outsiders' perspective on the Arctic, Giehmann differentiates her work from that of recent northern studies scholars who focus on "insiders' depictions of the north." Moreover, at both the beginning and end of her book, the author affirms the importance of her study by reminding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography (review)

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 6 (1) – Feb 24, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1944-6519
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Abstract

REVIEWS Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography, by Barbara Stefanie Giehmann. Germany: Konigshausen and Neumann, 2011. 455 pp. Cloth, = 49.80. C Barbara Stefanie Giehmann maps out the northern literary landscapes of London and Service in Writing the Northland: Jack London's and Robert W. Service's Imaginary Geography. Giehmann argues that with the closing of the frontier at the end of the nineteenth century, Americans began to view northern territory as the new West; that is, many imagined and idealized the North as a replacement for Western wilderness, which had become increasingly obsolete. Throughout the book, Giehmann distinguishes the north as a physical geography encompassing the Arctic regions of Canada, Russia, and the United States from the Northland as an imaginary untainted terrain standing for imperial dreams, hopes, and visions. Writing the Northland does a fine job of mapping out its mission: by illustrating that London and Service share an outsiders' perspective on the Arctic, Giehmann differentiates her work from that of recent northern studies scholars who focus on "insiders' depictions of the north." Moreover, at both the beginning and end of her book, the author affirms the importance of her study by reminding

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 24, 2011

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