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Writing in Multiple Genres

Writing in Multiple Genres Maxine Kumin Fifty years ago, before I even dared seek validation as a poet, I honed what was to be my craft by writing four and eight-line light verse fillers for the slicks ­ Ladies' Home Journal, Saturday Evening Post, the long-defunct New York Herald Tribune, even the Wall Street Journal. I was at that time a stay-at-home mother with two small children and a third on the way ­ in the oven, as we say of foals. On the weekends when my sainted spouse took over as minder and bottle washer I escaped into Boston to spend hours in the Medical Library on the Fenway tracking down sources to cite in the papers I ghost-wrote for several doctors at five dollars an hour ­ munificent pay back then, when baby sitters were for hire at thirty-five cents per hour, fifty if they did the ironing as well. Thank god, we no longer iron. By the end of the fifties I was a lightly published poet and a part-time instructor in English at Tufts University, one of the first two women ever hired in that department, but only licensed to teach freshman composition to the physical education majors http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

Writing in Multiple Genres

Prairie Schooner , Volume 79 (4) – May 18, 2005

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maxine Kumin Fifty years ago, before I even dared seek validation as a poet, I honed what was to be my craft by writing four and eight-line light verse fillers for the slicks ­ Ladies' Home Journal, Saturday Evening Post, the long-defunct New York Herald Tribune, even the Wall Street Journal. I was at that time a stay-at-home mother with two small children and a third on the way ­ in the oven, as we say of foals. On the weekends when my sainted spouse took over as minder and bottle washer I escaped into Boston to spend hours in the Medical Library on the Fenway tracking down sources to cite in the papers I ghost-wrote for several doctors at five dollars an hour ­ munificent pay back then, when baby sitters were for hire at thirty-five cents per hour, fifty if they did the ironing as well. Thank god, we no longer iron. By the end of the fifties I was a lightly published poet and a part-time instructor in English at Tufts University, one of the first two women ever hired in that department, but only licensed to teach freshman composition to the physical education majors

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 18, 2005

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