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Where We Were and What We Were Doing: August 19, 2003

Where We Were and What We Were Doing: August 19, 2003 Hilde Weisert Where We Were and What We Were Doing August 19, 2003 In traffic, changing stations, sick of the news where a woman with a rich European contralto commemorates her friends, their great hearts and their souls at this moment departing. We had our own years of where-we-were and what-we-were-doing, do we need these? What are we supposed to do, having marched, and cooked the great casseroles from the Women's Strike for Peace Cookbook, and hosted the night meetings in our living rooms? (Remember the talk, the certainty of where we were going?) Quaint, that Apocalypse, its one-by-one bullets, its rapturous End. * Late--but no end. The act of remembering is again our stand, again our pledge . . . But is it what the souls at that moment would ask for, would want? Would it comfort the passengers to know we would stop in our fields And turn our eyes upward, and speak? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

Where We Were and What We Were Doing: August 19, 2003

Prairie Schooner , Volume 83 (3) – Oct 1, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1542-426X
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Abstract

Hilde Weisert Where We Were and What We Were Doing August 19, 2003 In traffic, changing stations, sick of the news where a woman with a rich European contralto commemorates her friends, their great hearts and their souls at this moment departing. We had our own years of where-we-were and what-we-were-doing, do we need these? What are we supposed to do, having marched, and cooked the great casseroles from the Women's Strike for Peace Cookbook, and hosted the night meetings in our living rooms? (Remember the talk, the certainty of where we were going?) Quaint, that Apocalypse, its one-by-one bullets, its rapturous End. * Late--but no end. The act of remembering is again our stand, again our pledge . . . But is it what the souls at that moment would ask for, would want? Would it comfort the passengers to know we would stop in our fields And turn our eyes upward, and speak?

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 1, 2009

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