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Where Is the Jazz in Jazzercise?

Where Is the Jazz in Jazzercise? Sherrie Tucker Dancing toward an underworld of politicized musicality and scholarship, intellectual disobedience and freely chosen marginality that my mentor had meant to define as professional hell, I discovered an underworld filled with people of my ilk. --Suzanne Cusick, "Postscript: Dancing with the Ingrate"1 One does not "do" one's gender alone. One is always "doing" with or for another, even if the other is only imaginary. --Judith Butler, Undoing Gender2 Would you believe that Diana Krall is joining our playlist this week! We'll be working abs and core to her song "I'm a Little Mixed Up." --Jazzercise Facebook page, 20133 t has been over a decade since Suzanne Cusick, in her inimitably elegant and hilarious way, gifted me with a story about an imaginary panel for the American Musicological Society (ams). She credited feminist musicologist Annie Randall, who, in lamenting the abundance of authoritative offerings such as "What Are Isorhythms?," had proposed a satirical alternative: "What Is Jazzercise?" I roared as Suzanne regaled me with highlights from the sponta1 Suzanne G. Cusick, "Postscript: Dancing with the Ingrate," in Gender, Sexuality, and Early Music: Criticism and Analysis of Early Music, ed. T. M. Borgerding (New York: Routledge, 2002), 283. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
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Abstract

Sherrie Tucker Dancing toward an underworld of politicized musicality and scholarship, intellectual disobedience and freely chosen marginality that my mentor had meant to define as professional hell, I discovered an underworld filled with people of my ilk. --Suzanne Cusick, "Postscript: Dancing with the Ingrate"1 One does not "do" one's gender alone. One is always "doing" with or for another, even if the other is only imaginary. --Judith Butler, Undoing Gender2 Would you believe that Diana Krall is joining our playlist this week! We'll be working abs and core to her song "I'm a Little Mixed Up." --Jazzercise Facebook page, 20133 t has been over a decade since Suzanne Cusick, in her inimitably elegant and hilarious way, gifted me with a story about an imaginary panel for the American Musicological Society (ams). She credited feminist musicologist Annie Randall, who, in lamenting the abundance of authoritative offerings such as "What Are Isorhythms?," had proposed a satirical alternative: "What Is Jazzercise?" I roared as Suzanne regaled me with highlights from the sponta1 Suzanne G. Cusick, "Postscript: Dancing with the Ingrate," in Gender, Sexuality, and Early Music: Criticism and Analysis of Early Music, ed. T. M. Borgerding (New York: Routledge, 2002), 283.

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 10, 2015

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