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What’s Best for Baby? Co-Sleeping and the Politics of Inequality

What’s Best for Baby? Co-Sleeping and the Politics of Inequality What’s Best for Baby? Co- Sleeping and the Politics of Inequality Laura Harrison “Th e average adult weighs roughly twenty times as much as a newborn baby. Th at’s about the diff erence between your weight and the weight of an SUV.” So intones a deep male voice in a radio spot titled “Rollover,” fi rst aired in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in June 2010. Th e ad continues in a direct address to parents, advising them to engage in a brief experiment: those who believe that it is safe to sleep in a bed with their baby should fi rst ask friends to roll an SUV (an “immovable object”) on top of them. Parents who would choose not try this, the ad continues, are perhaps also smart enough to imagine how a baby feels when being suff ocated to death by a sleeping adult. If you love your baby, the announcer concludes, you should know that there is no safer place than in a crib: “It’s the best place to prevent a rollover accident— not to mention, a funeral.” Th is chilling advertisement was one piece of a multi- sited public health initiative called the Safe Sleep Campaign, launched by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies uni_neb

What’s Best for Baby? Co-Sleeping and the Politics of Inequality

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 39 (3) – Oct 23, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

What’s Best for Baby? Co- Sleeping and the Politics of Inequality Laura Harrison “Th e average adult weighs roughly twenty times as much as a newborn baby. Th at’s about the diff erence between your weight and the weight of an SUV.” So intones a deep male voice in a radio spot titled “Rollover,” fi rst aired in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in June 2010. Th e ad continues in a direct address to parents, advising them to engage in a brief experiment: those who believe that it is safe to sleep in a bed with their baby should fi rst ask friends to roll an SUV (an “immovable object”) on top of them. Parents who would choose not try this, the ad continues, are perhaps also smart enough to imagine how a baby feels when being suff ocated to death by a sleeping adult. If you love your baby, the announcer concludes, you should know that there is no safer place than in a crib: “It’s the best place to prevent a rollover accident— not to mention, a funeral.” Th is chilling advertisement was one piece of a multi- sited public health initiative called the Safe Sleep Campaign, launched by

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesuni_neb

Published: Oct 23, 2018

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