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What Looks like a Grave: Native and Anarchist Place-Making in New England

What Looks like a Grave: Native and Anarchist Place-Making in New England What Looks like a Grave Native and Anarchist Place- Making in New England Theresa Warburton When the Pilgrims fi rst landed on Cape Cod in 1620, they discovered ‘a place like a grave’. Digging it up, what troubled the graverobbers were not these Indian things, but the contents of a larger bundle: a blond European sailor, shipwrecked or abandoned on the Massachusetts coast. —William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England they fi nd what looks like a grave what looks like a grave a grave and they dig it up —Cheryl Savageau, “Before Moving on to Plymouth from Cape Cod— 1620” Introduction In the time I have been writing this essay, preparations for the com- memoration of the 400th anniversary of the voyage of the Mayflower have been ramping up on both sides of the pond with a four- nation con- sortium of the UK, US, Netherlands, and Wampanoag Nations coming together to create hundreds of events that highlight the political, cul- tural, and historical significance of the Pilgrims’ journey. For instance, from Plymouth, UK, an unmanned Mayflower Autonomous Ship will retrace the 1620 voyage of the Mayflower; Leiden, Netherlands, where the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

What Looks like a Grave: Native and Anarchist Place-Making in New England

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

What Looks like a Grave Native and Anarchist Place- Making in New England Theresa Warburton When the Pilgrims fi rst landed on Cape Cod in 1620, they discovered ‘a place like a grave’. Digging it up, what troubled the graverobbers were not these Indian things, but the contents of a larger bundle: a blond European sailor, shipwrecked or abandoned on the Massachusetts coast. —William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England they fi nd what looks like a grave what looks like a grave a grave and they dig it up —Cheryl Savageau, “Before Moving on to Plymouth from Cape Cod— 1620” Introduction In the time I have been writing this essay, preparations for the com- memoration of the 400th anniversary of the voyage of the Mayflower have been ramping up on both sides of the pond with a four- nation con- sortium of the UK, US, Netherlands, and Wampanoag Nations coming together to create hundreds of events that highlight the political, cul- tural, and historical significance of the Pilgrims’ journey. For instance, from Plymouth, UK, an unmanned Mayflower Autonomous Ship will retrace the 1620 voyage of the Mayflower; Leiden, Netherlands, where the

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2020

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