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What Is Left Behind

What Is Left Behind Bronwen Butter Newcott We used to pick cicada shells off bark and chain-link fences, move them to our shirts ­ half-fascinated, half-horrified by the air-swelled eyes and barbed hook-feet ­ the horror of possibility. We weren't scared then to pinch them, hear them crunch between our fingers, the violent crackles of more than dry leaf, flecks of membrane stuck to the skin of our thumbs, the bulbous eyes gone. We never studied the skeletons' wingless shapes, didn't put our mouths close, moisten the ghost-bodies with our breath, even tongues, to see if they tasted sweet like burnt sugar, to see if we too could breathe life into lifelessness, make the head turn, the legs claw. But we've learned there were careful steps that pulled fresh bodies, green-bellied with leaf-veined wings, through slits and left the shells behind, still malleable, the adults soft beside, wings hardening to flight, the shell drying too. We knew nothing of process, only that something had happened and left a fragile shape. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

What Is Left Behind

Prairie Schooner , Volume 80 (3)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bronwen Butter Newcott We used to pick cicada shells off bark and chain-link fences, move them to our shirts ­ half-fascinated, half-horrified by the air-swelled eyes and barbed hook-feet ­ the horror of possibility. We weren't scared then to pinch them, hear them crunch between our fingers, the violent crackles of more than dry leaf, flecks of membrane stuck to the skin of our thumbs, the bulbous eyes gone. We never studied the skeletons' wingless shapes, didn't put our mouths close, moisten the ghost-bodies with our breath, even tongues, to see if they tasted sweet like burnt sugar, to see if we too could breathe life into lifelessness, make the head turn, the legs claw. But we've learned there were careful steps that pulled fresh bodies, green-bellied with leaf-veined wings, through slits and left the shells behind, still malleable, the adults soft beside, wings hardening to flight, the shell drying too. We knew nothing of process, only that something had happened and left a fragile shape.

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

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