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“We are among the poor, the powerless, the inexperienced and the inarticulate”: Clyde Warrior’s Campaign for a “Greater Indian America”

“We are among the poor, the powerless, the inexperienced and the inarticulate”: Clyde Warrior’s... "We are among the poor, the powerless, the inexperienced and the inarticulate" Clyde Warrior's Campaign for a "Greater Indian America" paul mckenzie-jones The 1960s was a turbulent decade as cultures merged, clashed, and often created subcultures within American society. Mass protests, demonstrations, riots, and violence scarred the nation's psyche as America's youth, of all colors and creeds, demanded a new style of leadership and new rules for living. One such activist was Clyde Warrior (Ponca), a founding member of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC). Warrior was a leading influence upon the generation of college-educated Indians who participated in the Red Power movement of the 1960s. Long before "Red Power" became the jingoistic slogan of the American Indian Movement at the end of the 1960s and in the early 1970s, Warrior and NIYC cofounder, Mel Thom (Paiute), adopted the phrase as a tongue-in-cheek response to the Black Power movement. Although he always disputed the idea, to many people Warrior was not only an advocate of American Indian rights until his tragically early death in 1968 but the leader of the Red Power movement.1 Warrior's many speeches and articles bristled with anger at federal imposition upon and colonial administration http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

“We are among the poor, the powerless, the inexperienced and the inarticulate”: Clyde Warrior’s Campaign for a “Greater Indian America”

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (2) – Apr 2, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
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Abstract

"We are among the poor, the powerless, the inexperienced and the inarticulate" Clyde Warrior's Campaign for a "Greater Indian America" paul mckenzie-jones The 1960s was a turbulent decade as cultures merged, clashed, and often created subcultures within American society. Mass protests, demonstrations, riots, and violence scarred the nation's psyche as America's youth, of all colors and creeds, demanded a new style of leadership and new rules for living. One such activist was Clyde Warrior (Ponca), a founding member of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC). Warrior was a leading influence upon the generation of college-educated Indians who participated in the Red Power movement of the 1960s. Long before "Red Power" became the jingoistic slogan of the American Indian Movement at the end of the 1960s and in the early 1970s, Warrior and NIYC cofounder, Mel Thom (Paiute), adopted the phrase as a tongue-in-cheek response to the Black Power movement. Although he always disputed the idea, to many people Warrior was not only an advocate of American Indian rights until his tragically early death in 1968 but the leader of the Red Power movement.1 Warrior's many speeches and articles bristled with anger at federal imposition upon and colonial administration

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 2, 2010

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