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Wampum as Hypertext: An American Indian Intellectual Tradition of Multimedia Theory and Practice

Wampum as Hypertext: An American Indian Intellectual Tradition of Multimedia Theory and Practice Wampum as Hypertext An American Indian Intellectual Tradition of Multimedia Theory and Practice angela m. haas We do not weave the web of life; we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. Chief Seattle of the West Coast Duwamish, 1854 We round the corner of the Many Tribes, Many Trails gallery that maps the U.S. government's forced removal of other indigenous tribes into the Cherokee Removal gallery at the Cherokee Heritage Center Trail of Tears exhibit.1 The wind is howling; it's freezing cold. We walk among the ghosts of our ancestors, some clinging to each other, others with walking sticks, others pulling their coats close. We pull each other close alongside the wampum belt record. Surrounded by the white wampum honor beads that lay the path for the continuance of our culture and language, the purple wampum beads remind us of the survival of some but the genocide of thousands. We weep. As you say, Qwo-Li, "We are not the ones who forget. We remember. . . . Our bodies hold everything we are told to forget." This essay traces a counterstory to Western claims to the origins of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures uni_neb

Wampum as Hypertext: An American Indian Intellectual Tradition of Multimedia Theory and Practice

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the individual contributors. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

Wampum as Hypertext An American Indian Intellectual Tradition of Multimedia Theory and Practice angela m. haas We do not weave the web of life; we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. Chief Seattle of the West Coast Duwamish, 1854 We round the corner of the Many Tribes, Many Trails gallery that maps the U.S. government's forced removal of other indigenous tribes into the Cherokee Removal gallery at the Cherokee Heritage Center Trail of Tears exhibit.1 The wind is howling; it's freezing cold. We walk among the ghosts of our ancestors, some clinging to each other, others with walking sticks, others pulling their coats close. We pull each other close alongside the wampum belt record. Surrounded by the white wampum honor beads that lay the path for the continuance of our culture and language, the purple wampum beads remind us of the survival of some but the genocide of thousands. We weep. As you say, Qwo-Li, "We are not the ones who forget. We remember. . . . Our bodies hold everything we are told to forget." This essay traces a counterstory to Western claims to the origins of

Journal

Studies in American Indian Literaturesuni_neb

Published: Apr 4, 2008

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