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Waiting Room, Messenger, Target, and Woman Warrior

Waiting Room, Messenger, Target, and Woman Warrior katherine kadish The image on the cover, Pattern #10, is from the series of "pattern" paintings and assemblages that began with a single painting for an exhibition of selfportraits in the summer of 1999. I had just moved all of my finished and unfinished canvases to a new storage space next to my studio, and in the process I unearthed twenty-year-old half-forgotten and half-finished paintings in which I had been experimenting with pattern pieces. These paintings still felt potent to me, filled with possibility and levels of meaning, both personal and general. In the past year and a half, the series has taken on a life of its own. I am using ideas and objects, which continue to haunt and surprise me. Clearly, these pieces owe a debt to Dadaist sensibility, but they involve personal history and perception, as well as a lifelong and quite literal interest in both the evocative power of shapes and how a changing context also changes our understanding of shape. To begin with, sewing was my mother's primary mode of expression and the clearest expression, also, of her personality. I learned the rudiments, both at school and at home, but my interest was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Waiting Room, Messenger, Target, and Woman Warrior

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

katherine kadish The image on the cover, Pattern #10, is from the series of "pattern" paintings and assemblages that began with a single painting for an exhibition of selfportraits in the summer of 1999. I had just moved all of my finished and unfinished canvases to a new storage space next to my studio, and in the process I unearthed twenty-year-old half-forgotten and half-finished paintings in which I had been experimenting with pattern pieces. These paintings still felt potent to me, filled with possibility and levels of meaning, both personal and general. In the past year and a half, the series has taken on a life of its own. I am using ideas and objects, which continue to haunt and surprise me. Clearly, these pieces owe a debt to Dadaist sensibility, but they involve personal history and perception, as well as a lifelong and quite literal interest in both the evocative power of shapes and how a changing context also changes our understanding of shape. To begin with, sewing was my mother's primary mode of expression and the clearest expression, also, of her personality. I learned the rudiments, both at school and at home, but my interest was

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 4, 2002

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