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Violence in the Borderlands: Crossing to the Home Space in the Novels of Ana Castillo

Violence in the Borderlands: Crossing to the Home Space in the Novels of Ana Castillo Violence in the Borderlands Crossing to the Home Space in the Novels of Ana Castillo kelli lyon johnson To survive the Borderlands You must live sin fronteras, be a crossroads. Gloria Anzaldúa The characters in Ana Castillo's novels inhabit borderlands. Mixed in identity, nationality, race, and language, these characters signify the border culture between the United States and Mexico that is embodied in the Spanish and Indigenous mezcla that resulted from the colonization of the "New World." Gloria Anzaldúa defines a borderland as "a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional residue of an unnatural boundary. . . . in a constant state of transition," and she argues that within this borderland, the "prohibited and forbidden are its inhabitants." In the novels of Ana Castillo the metaphor of border crossing aptly describes the way violence intersects with gender, nationality, and sexuality. Mestizas who cross borders suffer violent consequences--social, political, and above all sexual. Throughout her fiction Castillo's male characters use violence to control women's sexuality and to avenge its violation by other men, imposing and enforcing women's place-- both the physical space women inhabit and the psychological and social space by which women are defined. Women's place http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Violence in the Borderlands: Crossing to the Home Space in the Novels of Ana Castillo

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Violence in the Borderlands Crossing to the Home Space in the Novels of Ana Castillo kelli lyon johnson To survive the Borderlands You must live sin fronteras, be a crossroads. Gloria Anzaldúa The characters in Ana Castillo's novels inhabit borderlands. Mixed in identity, nationality, race, and language, these characters signify the border culture between the United States and Mexico that is embodied in the Spanish and Indigenous mezcla that resulted from the colonization of the "New World." Gloria Anzaldúa defines a borderland as "a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional residue of an unnatural boundary. . . . in a constant state of transition," and she argues that within this borderland, the "prohibited and forbidden are its inhabitants." In the novels of Ana Castillo the metaphor of border crossing aptly describes the way violence intersects with gender, nationality, and sexuality. Mestizas who cross borders suffer violent consequences--social, political, and above all sexual. Throughout her fiction Castillo's male characters use violence to control women's sexuality and to avenge its violation by other men, imposing and enforcing women's place-- both the physical space women inhabit and the psychological and social space by which women are defined. Women's place

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 20, 2004

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