Uto-Aztecan Maize Agriculture: A Linguistic Puzzle from Southern California

Uto-Aztecan Maize Agriculture: A Linguistic Puzzle from Southern California <p>Abstract:</p><p>The hypothesis that the members of the Proto–Uto-Aztecan speech community were maize farmers is premised in part on the assumption that a Proto–Uto-Aztecan etymon for &apos;maize&apos; can be reconstructed; this implies that cognates with maize-related meanings should be attested in languages in both the Northern and Southern branches of the language family. A Proto–Southern Uto-Aztecan etymon for &apos;maize&apos; is reconstructible, but the only potential cognate for these terms documented in a Northern Uto-Aztecan language is a single Gabrielino word. However, this word cannot be identified definitively as cognate with the Southern Uto-Aztecan terms for &apos;maize&apos;; consequently, the existence of a Proto–Uto-Aztecan word for &apos;maize&apos; cannot be postulated.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Uto-Aztecan Maize Agriculture: A Linguistic Puzzle from Southern California

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/uto-aztecan-maize-agriculture-a-linguistic-puzzle-from-southern-v95uFvpvzv
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>The hypothesis that the members of the Proto–Uto-Aztecan speech community were maize farmers is premised in part on the assumption that a Proto–Uto-Aztecan etymon for &apos;maize&apos; can be reconstructed; this implies that cognates with maize-related meanings should be attested in languages in both the Northern and Southern branches of the language family. A Proto–Southern Uto-Aztecan etymon for &apos;maize&apos; is reconstructible, but the only potential cognate for these terms documented in a Northern Uto-Aztecan language is a single Gabrielino word. However, this word cannot be identified definitively as cognate with the Southern Uto-Aztecan terms for &apos;maize&apos;; consequently, the existence of a Proto–Uto-Aztecan word for &apos;maize&apos; cannot be postulated.</p>

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 9, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off