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Unghosting Bones: Resistant Play(s) versus the Legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Unghosting Bones: Resistant Play(s) versus the Legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial School Unghosting Bones Resistant Play(s) versus the Legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial School Jen Shook “Flesh can house no memory of bone. Only bone speaks memory of fl esh.” —Rebecca Schneider, “Archives: Performance Remains” “We talk about historical trauma . . . A hundred and thirty years later, this still has an impact on our youth. We’re trying to make peace with those spirits and bring them home.” —Russell Eagle Bear, Rosebud Sioux Historic Preservation Offi cer In N. Scott Momaday’s Th e Moon in Two Windows, Luther Standing Bear, the fi rst graduate of Carlisle Indian Industrial School, returns years later to catch a football game between Carlisle and the Army team. Moon closes as Luther and his son walk through the graves of Carlisle’s ceme- tery, a resonant site for those who refuse to forget the genocidal legacy of the boarding school system launched at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Th e young boy points to distant fi gures of a man and a child holding hands, swinging “round and round” (Momaday 177). Th ough the script does not identify them, the image echoes an earlier moment when Etahdleuh, an older member of Luther’s transitional generation, swings round and round with Grass, the ghost http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Unghosting Bones: Resistant Play(s) versus the Legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 32 (1) – Sep 11, 2020

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Unghosting Bones Resistant Play(s) versus the Legacy of Carlisle Indian Industrial School Jen Shook “Flesh can house no memory of bone. Only bone speaks memory of fl esh.” —Rebecca Schneider, “Archives: Performance Remains” “We talk about historical trauma . . . A hundred and thirty years later, this still has an impact on our youth. We’re trying to make peace with those spirits and bring them home.” —Russell Eagle Bear, Rosebud Sioux Historic Preservation Offi cer In N. Scott Momaday’s Th e Moon in Two Windows, Luther Standing Bear, the fi rst graduate of Carlisle Indian Industrial School, returns years later to catch a football game between Carlisle and the Army team. Moon closes as Luther and his son walk through the graves of Carlisle’s ceme- tery, a resonant site for those who refuse to forget the genocidal legacy of the boarding school system launched at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Th e young boy points to distant fi gures of a man and a child holding hands, swinging “round and round” (Momaday 177). Th ough the script does not identify them, the image echoes an earlier moment when Etahdleuh, an older member of Luther’s transitional generation, swings round and round with Grass, the ghost

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2020

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