Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Twilight of the Humanities: Rethinking (Post)Humanism with J.M. Coetzee

Twilight of the Humanities: Rethinking (Post)Humanism with J.M. Coetzee Expressionism), literature (Musil, The Man without Qualities), and philosophy (Heidegger, Being and Time) in the Germany of the first third of the 20th century a break with the previous epoch. In short, what the twilight-trope signals is the manner in which to sequester literary critical epochs and especially "discursive formations" (Foucault) as either complete ruptures with previous ones or as transformations over a longer time period begging a verdict on what would be at stake in respect of an approaching posthumanist turn. Hence the question: are such late 20th century movements prefixed by "post"--as in Postmodernism, Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism and, finally, Posthumanism a mere temporal (hyphened) "after" or do they constitute a clear break on an epistemological plane as a Foucauldian type archeological approach as advocated by Wolfe (2010, xvi) would suggest? On the one hand, Posthumanism can arguably be said to constitute such a break because of its focus on the hitherto occluded question of the (hu)man, homo, anthropos, l'homme, Mensch as a species being "naked, unshod, unbedded, unarmed," that, already according to the Prometheus myth told in Plato's Protagoras,2 is the one mortal creature without quality, who despite (or because) of this void nevertheless found himself at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Twilight of the Humanities: Rethinking (Post)Humanism with J.M. Coetzee

symploke , Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/twilight-of-the-humanities-rethinking-post-humanism-with-j-m-coetzee-VC5rnuwA80
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Expressionism), literature (Musil, The Man without Qualities), and philosophy (Heidegger, Being and Time) in the Germany of the first third of the 20th century a break with the previous epoch. In short, what the twilight-trope signals is the manner in which to sequester literary critical epochs and especially "discursive formations" (Foucault) as either complete ruptures with previous ones or as transformations over a longer time period begging a verdict on what would be at stake in respect of an approaching posthumanist turn. Hence the question: are such late 20th century movements prefixed by "post"--as in Postmodernism, Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism and, finally, Posthumanism a mere temporal (hyphened) "after" or do they constitute a clear break on an epistemological plane as a Foucauldian type archeological approach as advocated by Wolfe (2010, xvi) would suggest? On the one hand, Posthumanism can arguably be said to constitute such a break because of its focus on the hitherto occluded question of the (hu)man, homo, anthropos, l'homme, Mensch as a species being "naked, unshod, unbedded, unarmed," that, already according to the Prometheus myth told in Plato's Protagoras,2 is the one mortal creature without quality, who despite (or because) of this void nevertheless found himself at

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

There are no references for this article.