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Turning the Song: Music, Power, and the Aesthetics of Collaboration

Turning the Song: Music, Power, and the Aesthetics of Collaboration Turning the Song Music, Power, and the Aesthetics of Collaboration angela glaros, Eastern Illinois University "Sing me a song." The request startled me, coming as it did in my first conversation with Aliki Lambrou, a singer and folklore researcher on the Greek island of Skyros. I had called her on my cell phone from the neighboring island of Evia, where I stayed with relatives while preparing to move to Skyros to begin dissertation research on gender and vocal music on the island. Eager to move my project along, I explained it to Aliki and asked for her assistance and direction. She responded by asking me to sing. I sang the first thing that came into my head, a piece from the Greek smyrneiko repertory that I had performed with the University of Illinois Balkan Music Ensemble.1 Aliki complimented my singing and then asked, "Have you ever been in love? Because that's very important if you want to understand this music." I responded that indeed I had been in love and also knew heartbreak. In turn, she sang a powerfully moving Skyrian song to me. Most Skyrian songs, as islanders later told me, sing of love, particularly love that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Turning the Song: Music, Power, and the Aesthetics of Collaboration

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 6 (1) – Feb 27, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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2152-4009
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Abstract

Turning the Song Music, Power, and the Aesthetics of Collaboration angela glaros, Eastern Illinois University "Sing me a song." The request startled me, coming as it did in my first conversation with Aliki Lambrou, a singer and folklore researcher on the Greek island of Skyros. I had called her on my cell phone from the neighboring island of Evia, where I stayed with relatives while preparing to move to Skyros to begin dissertation research on gender and vocal music on the island. Eager to move my project along, I explained it to Aliki and asked for her assistance and direction. She responded by asking me to sing. I sang the first thing that came into my head, a piece from the Greek smyrneiko repertory that I had performed with the University of Illinois Balkan Music Ensemble.1 Aliki complimented my singing and then asked, "Have you ever been in love? Because that's very important if you want to understand this music." I responded that indeed I had been in love and also knew heartbreak. In turn, she sang a powerfully moving Skyrian song to me. Most Skyrian songs, as islanders later told me, sing of love, particularly love that

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 27, 2013

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