Transcultural Writers and Novels in the Age of Global Mobility by Arianna Dagnino (review)

Transcultural Writers and Novels in the Age of Global Mobility by Arianna Dagnino (review) Book Notes view of the world, Nicolescu explains that this perspective views the gap between what is known and what is unknown, as physicist David Gross explains, as the gap between the volume of a sphere and its surface, both of which are increasing simultaneously, but the volume (representing what we know) is expanding faster than the surface (representing what we don't know). Thus, the materialist believes that everything that is unknown will one day be known. For Nicolescu, in contrast, the sphere represents what is known, but what is unknown can be understood in terms of a series of smaller spheres within the larger sphere. As we learn more and more, these smaller spheres shrink in size, moving science forward, but "the unknown is constantly present, in an irreducible manner: it is manifested by points that will be present, whatever we do, inside the sphere of the known. And could not we define the sacred as being precisely all that is irreducible in relation to mental operations?" (133). Thus, Nicolescu carves out a space for philosophy and spirituality in science. Nicolescu's central argument would be neither weaker nor stronger without some of the chapters in the final http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Transcultural Writers and Novels in the Age of Global Mobility by Arianna Dagnino (review)

symploke, Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Notes view of the world, Nicolescu explains that this perspective views the gap between what is known and what is unknown, as physicist David Gross explains, as the gap between the volume of a sphere and its surface, both of which are increasing simultaneously, but the volume (representing what we know) is expanding faster than the surface (representing what we don't know). Thus, the materialist believes that everything that is unknown will one day be known. For Nicolescu, in contrast, the sphere represents what is known, but what is unknown can be understood in terms of a series of smaller spheres within the larger sphere. As we learn more and more, these smaller spheres shrink in size, moving science forward, but "the unknown is constantly present, in an irreducible manner: it is manifested by points that will be present, whatever we do, inside the sphere of the known. And could not we define the sacred as being precisely all that is irreducible in relation to mental operations?" (133). Thus, Nicolescu carves out a space for philosophy and spirituality in science. Nicolescu's central argument would be neither weaker nor stronger without some of the chapters in the final

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symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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