Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Practices for Environmental Sustainability ed. by Melissa K. Nelson and Dan Shilling (review)

Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Practices for Environmental... Book Reviews Melissa K. Nelson and Dan Shilling, eds. Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Practices for Environmental Sustainability. Cambridge UP, 2018. 978- 1- 108- 42856- 9. 276 pp. Geoff Hamilton, Medicine Hat College As its title suggests, this book explores Indigenous peoples’ Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and its relevance to conceptions of envi- ronmental sustainability. Th e fourteen essays collected here, the major- ity of them by Indigenous scholars, focus on North America and cover a range of disciplines and methodologies. Th e essential philosophical assumptions bound up with TEK, some of its ongoing practical appli- cations, and its profound signifi cance for both Indigenous and non- Indigenous peoples, are incisively and compellingly set forth in these chapters. A particularly attractive element of this collection, moreover, is the way it off ers distillations by a number of scholars of their own larger bodies of work, making it especially useful as a primer on complex dis- cussions published elsewhere. The first grouping of essays, “Introduction to Key Concepts and Questions,” provides an illuminating orientation to the book’s core con- cerns. Dan Shilling identifies some of the important commonalities that can be discerned in Native American environmental attitudes— most crucially, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Practices for Environmental Sustainability ed. by Melissa K. Nelson and Dan Shilling (review)

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 32 (1) – Sep 11, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/traditional-ecological-knowledge-learning-from-indigenous-practices-M0RrPV6KMu
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Book Reviews Melissa K. Nelson and Dan Shilling, eds. Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Learning from Indigenous Practices for Environmental Sustainability. Cambridge UP, 2018. 978- 1- 108- 42856- 9. 276 pp. Geoff Hamilton, Medicine Hat College As its title suggests, this book explores Indigenous peoples’ Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and its relevance to conceptions of envi- ronmental sustainability. Th e fourteen essays collected here, the major- ity of them by Indigenous scholars, focus on North America and cover a range of disciplines and methodologies. Th e essential philosophical assumptions bound up with TEK, some of its ongoing practical appli- cations, and its profound signifi cance for both Indigenous and non- Indigenous peoples, are incisively and compellingly set forth in these chapters. A particularly attractive element of this collection, moreover, is the way it off ers distillations by a number of scholars of their own larger bodies of work, making it especially useful as a primer on complex dis- cussions published elsewhere. The first grouping of essays, “Introduction to Key Concepts and Questions,” provides an illuminating orientation to the book’s core con- cerns. Dan Shilling identifies some of the important commonalities that can be discerned in Native American environmental attitudes— most crucially,

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2020

There are no references for this article.