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“This Makes No Sense At All”: Heterarchy in Fictional Universes

“This Makes No Sense At All”: Heterarchy in Fictional Universes "This Makes No Sense At All" Heterarchy in Fictional Universes Rüdiger Heinze On June 1, 2012, one day after the premiere of the film Prometheus in London, the bbc conducted a radio interview with the film's director, Ridley Scott. In the course of the interview, the host asked Scott if the film, although clearly being "in the same constellation, the same galaxy," was a prequel to Scott's 1979 film Alien, to which Scott replied, "absolutely not" (qtd. in Mayo and Kermode 2012: n. pag.). The comment prompted a lively debate in numerous fanzines, magazines, and newspapers (e.g., The Guardian, New York Post, Scientific American, Huffington Post). Whether or not one considers Prometheus a prequel to Alien wholly depends, of course, on one's definition of "prequel": a general definition of "prequel" as a fictional storyworld1 that is chronologically prior to, but in the same fictional universe as, another fictional storyworld would make Prometheus a prequel; a specified definition of "prequel" that additionally requires fairly close temporal proximity between the storyworlds, a (logical/causal) connec- tion of plots, and the inclusion of some key characters at an earlier age or stage would make Prometheus indeed part of "the same constellation, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative Studies University of Nebraska Press

“This Makes No Sense At All”: Heterarchy in Fictional Universes

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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2156-7204
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Abstract

"This Makes No Sense At All" Heterarchy in Fictional Universes Rüdiger Heinze On June 1, 2012, one day after the premiere of the film Prometheus in London, the bbc conducted a radio interview with the film's director, Ridley Scott. In the course of the interview, the host asked Scott if the film, although clearly being "in the same constellation, the same galaxy," was a prequel to Scott's 1979 film Alien, to which Scott replied, "absolutely not" (qtd. in Mayo and Kermode 2012: n. pag.). The comment prompted a lively debate in numerous fanzines, magazines, and newspapers (e.g., The Guardian, New York Post, Scientific American, Huffington Post). Whether or not one considers Prometheus a prequel to Alien wholly depends, of course, on one's definition of "prequel": a general definition of "prequel" as a fictional storyworld1 that is chronologically prior to, but in the same fictional universe as, another fictional storyworld would make Prometheus a prequel; a specified definition of "prequel" that additionally requires fairly close temporal proximity between the storyworlds, a (logical/causal) connec- tion of plots, and the inclusion of some key characters at an earlier age or stage would make Prometheus indeed part of "the same constellation, the

Journal

StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 25, 2015

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