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"They Shut Me Up in Prose": A Cautionary Tale of Two Emilys

"They Shut Me Up in Prose": A Cautionary Tale of Two Emilys Judy Nolte Temple Judy Nolte Temple "They shut me up in Prose"-- Emily Dickinson, Poem 613, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson Young Emily Dickinson, born in 1830 to a prestigious Amherst family, played with her dog Carlo and wrote letters and verses. Young Emily Hawley, born in 1838 to a subsistence-level Michigan farm family, played with her dog Carlo and wrote letters, verses, and a diary. Emily Dickinson grew increasingly reclusive and was considered eccentric. Emily Hawley Gillespie grew increasingly isolated as an Iowa farm wife and was considered eccentric due to her interests in women's rights and free love. Emily Dickinson died in 1886, whereupon almost two thousand poems were discovered by her sister. Upon the publication of some edited verses in 1890, Dickinson was pronounced an extraordinary--albeit irregular-- poet. Emily Gillespie died in 1888, whereupon her 2,500-page journal was read, copied, and eventually archived by her daughter Sarah Huftalen. Upon its edited publication in 1989, Gillespie was pronounced an extraordinary diarist whose text, covering over thirty years, revealed a complex story of youthful promise thwarted in a troubled marriage that produced an emerging feminist voice.1 In the 1950s, Thomas H. Johnson published a detailed study http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

"They Shut Me Up in Prose": A Cautionary Tale of Two Emilys

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

Judy Nolte Temple Judy Nolte Temple "They shut me up in Prose"-- Emily Dickinson, Poem 613, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson Young Emily Dickinson, born in 1830 to a prestigious Amherst family, played with her dog Carlo and wrote letters and verses. Young Emily Hawley, born in 1838 to a subsistence-level Michigan farm family, played with her dog Carlo and wrote letters, verses, and a diary. Emily Dickinson grew increasingly reclusive and was considered eccentric. Emily Hawley Gillespie grew increasingly isolated as an Iowa farm wife and was considered eccentric due to her interests in women's rights and free love. Emily Dickinson died in 1886, whereupon almost two thousand poems were discovered by her sister. Upon the publication of some edited verses in 1890, Dickinson was pronounced an extraordinary--albeit irregular-- poet. Emily Gillespie died in 1888, whereupon her 2,500-page journal was read, copied, and eventually archived by her daughter Sarah Huftalen. Upon its edited publication in 1989, Gillespie was pronounced an extraordinary diarist whose text, covering over thirty years, revealed a complex story of youthful promise thwarted in a troubled marriage that produced an emerging feminist voice.1 In the 1950s, Thomas H. Johnson published a detailed study

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 4, 2001

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