There's Something about Barry: Media Representations of a Home Run King

There's Something about Barry: Media Representations of a Home Run King There's Something about Barry Media Representations of a Home Run King matt ventresca On August 8, 2007, Barry Bonds broke Hank Aaron's longstanding majorleague record by hitting his 756th career home run. Despite the historical magnitude of this feat, Bonds's accomplishment was not widely celebrated or accompanied by a flood of praise and adulation for the new record holder. The commissioner of Major League Baseball (MLB), Bud Selig, did not attend the record-setting game. Hank Aaron was not on hand to personally congratulate his successor.1 Bonds's achievement was greeted with mixed reactions from the sports media and from fans as it was announced at stadiums in other major-league cities.2 The lack of celebration and nationwide approval for Bonds, a player who holds both of MLB's most prestigious home run records, raises important questions regarding the relationships between sport, culture, and the process of myth creation.3 Bonds's status in the baseball pantheon is questioned despite winning seven Most Valuable Player awards and garnering fourteen All-Star selections. An eight-time Gold Glove winner, Bonds is also the only player in major-league history with 500 home runs and 500 stolen bases.4 However, these numerous statistical achievements and accolades are overshadowed in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture University of Nebraska Press

There's Something about Barry: Media Representations of a Home Run King

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There's Something about Barry Media Representations of a Home Run King matt ventresca On August 8, 2007, Barry Bonds broke Hank Aaron's longstanding majorleague record by hitting his 756th career home run. Despite the historical magnitude of this feat, Bonds's accomplishment was not widely celebrated or accompanied by a flood of praise and adulation for the new record holder. The commissioner of Major League Baseball (MLB), Bud Selig, did not attend the record-setting game. Hank Aaron was not on hand to personally congratulate his successor.1 Bonds's achievement was greeted with mixed reactions from the sports media and from fans as it was announced at stadiums in other major-league cities.2 The lack of celebration and nationwide approval for Bonds, a player who holds both of MLB's most prestigious home run records, raises important questions regarding the relationships between sport, culture, and the process of myth creation.3 Bonds's status in the baseball pantheon is questioned despite winning seven Most Valuable Player awards and garnering fourteen All-Star selections. An eight-time Gold Glove winner, Bonds is also the only player in major-league history with 500 home runs and 500 stolen bases.4 However, these numerous statistical achievements and accolades are overshadowed in the

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 22, 2011

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