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Theory in Black: Teleological Suspensions in Philosophy of Culture

Theory in Black: Teleological Suspensions in Philosophy of Culture ARTICLES Theory in Black Teleological Suspensions in Philosophy of Culture lewis r. gordon My aim in this essay is to explore some challenges in the philosophy of culture that emerge from its often repressed but symbiotic relationship with what Enrique Dussel calls "the underside of modernity."1 Philosophy of culture and its forms in various disciplines of the human sciences have often avowed French, Germanic, and Scottish roots, through a repression or denial not only of the African, Native American, and Oceanic peoples who function as sources of taxonomical anxiety but also of such sources from "within," so to speak; Spanish influences, for instance, with their resources from Jewish and Muslim social worlds, acquired a peripheral status. Throughout, as I have shown in An Introduction to Africana Philosophy, there have been those who thought otherwise, and their stories reveal the centering of the question of "man" in the modern world in a movement that led from his definition to his conditions of possibility.2 To study these conditions calls for identifying the subject of study, the main difficulty in studying such a subject, and the reasoning behind such claims. In studying culture we study the being or beings that create http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences University of Nebraska Press

Theory in Black: Teleological Suspensions in Philosophy of Culture

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University of Nebraska Press
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Abstract

ARTICLES Theory in Black Teleological Suspensions in Philosophy of Culture lewis r. gordon My aim in this essay is to explore some challenges in the philosophy of culture that emerge from its often repressed but symbiotic relationship with what Enrique Dussel calls "the underside of modernity."1 Philosophy of culture and its forms in various disciplines of the human sciences have often avowed French, Germanic, and Scottish roots, through a repression or denial not only of the African, Native American, and Oceanic peoples who function as sources of taxonomical anxiety but also of such sources from "within," so to speak; Spanish influences, for instance, with their resources from Jewish and Muslim social worlds, acquired a peripheral status. Throughout, as I have shown in An Introduction to Africana Philosophy, there have been those who thought otherwise, and their stories reveal the centering of the question of "man" in the modern world in a movement that led from his definition to his conditions of possibility.2 To study these conditions calls for identifying the subject of study, the main difficulty in studying such a subject, and the reasoning behind such claims. In studying culture we study the being or beings that create

Journal

Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 21, 2010

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