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“The Young Ladies Are Here”: Marshallese Transgender Performance and Processes of Transformation

“The Young Ladies Are Here”: Marshallese Transgender Performance and Processes of Transformation "The Young Ladies Are Here" Marshallese Transgender Performance and Processes of Transformation Jessica A. Schwartz he following is a folktale from Rongelap Atoll, a ring of coral islands located in the northern part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (rmi) and currently uninhabited due to environmental contamination from the United States' nuclear testing program (1946­58). There were two sisters who lived with their parents on Rongelap Atoll. While the younger daughter was favored by the parents, the older daughter was unloved. One day, the family went to the forest, and the parents decided to leave the oldest daughter behind. All alone and abandoned, the oldest daughter began to cry. As she was crying, she heard a bird atop a tree crying as well. When the girl looked up, the bird dropped excrement into her eye. After a few minutes, the girl began to grow wings in place of her arms. The bird, which before had been a fairy, turned the girl into a beautiful bird who now had the freedom to fly and leave the confines of the forest. She flew back to her parents' house and turned her younger sister into a bird, and the two http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

“The Young Ladies Are Here”: Marshallese Transgender Performance and Processes of Transformation

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
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Abstract

"The Young Ladies Are Here" Marshallese Transgender Performance and Processes of Transformation Jessica A. Schwartz he following is a folktale from Rongelap Atoll, a ring of coral islands located in the northern part of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (rmi) and currently uninhabited due to environmental contamination from the United States' nuclear testing program (1946­58). There were two sisters who lived with their parents on Rongelap Atoll. While the younger daughter was favored by the parents, the older daughter was unloved. One day, the family went to the forest, and the parents decided to leave the oldest daughter behind. All alone and abandoned, the oldest daughter began to cry. As she was crying, she heard a bird atop a tree crying as well. When the girl looked up, the bird dropped excrement into her eye. After a few minutes, the girl began to grow wings in place of her arms. The bird, which before had been a fairy, turned the girl into a beautiful bird who now had the freedom to fly and leave the confines of the forest. She flew back to her parents' house and turned her younger sister into a bird, and the two

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 10, 2015

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