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"The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance (review)

"The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance (review) her poetry and prose. While situating her within a specific historical period, Eiselein comes to the conclusion that Menken's reputation, then and now, is dependent on these inconsistencies. His compilation and analysis very clearly provides a basis for further research that uses the inconsistencies of her life and work as the dialectical framework of interpretation. "The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance. By Christina Accomando. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2001. 304 pp. $22.95. Reviewed by Samantha Manchester Earley, Indiana University Southeast In "The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance, Christina Accomando argues that African Americans have a long history of resistance to the dominant white culture that would define them in opposition to itself as not white, not free, not human, and so on. Part of this resistance to the dominant culture's denial of African American voice, subjectivity, and agency emerged in the form of literature-- poetry, narrative, and song--that functioned as "testimony" against social and legal discrimination. Accomando focuses her analysis on these testimonies of African American women, in particular, who embodied all of the oppositional definitions listed above but also were "not male." She reads the testimonies of Phillis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

"The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance (review)

Legacy , Volume 20 (1) – Nov 18, 2003

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Nebraska.
ISSN
1534-0643
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Abstract

her poetry and prose. While situating her within a specific historical period, Eiselein comes to the conclusion that Menken's reputation, then and now, is dependent on these inconsistencies. His compilation and analysis very clearly provides a basis for further research that uses the inconsistencies of her life and work as the dialectical framework of interpretation. "The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance. By Christina Accomando. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2001. 304 pp. $22.95. Reviewed by Samantha Manchester Earley, Indiana University Southeast In "The Regulations of Robbers": Legal Fictions of Slavery and Resistance, Christina Accomando argues that African Americans have a long history of resistance to the dominant white culture that would define them in opposition to itself as not white, not free, not human, and so on. Part of this resistance to the dominant culture's denial of African American voice, subjectivity, and agency emerged in the form of literature-- poetry, narrative, and song--that functioned as "testimony" against social and legal discrimination. Accomando focuses her analysis on these testimonies of African American women, in particular, who embodied all of the oppositional definitions listed above but also were "not male." She reads the testimonies of Phillis

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 18, 2003

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