Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

"The Queer Feeling We All Know": Queer Objects and Orientations in Edith Wharton's (Haunted) Houses

"The Queer Feeling We All Know": Queer Objects and Orientations in Edith Wharton's (Haunted) Houses Shannon Brennan Carthage College n the night that follows his impetuous stab at heteronormativity, Edith Wharton's queerest character is startled to consciousness by his sense of an intruding, untoward object. "I was waked by the queer feeling we all know," Andrew Culwin reflects, "--the feeling that there was something in the room that hadn't been there when I fell asleep" (43). Culwin, the interpellated narrator of "The Eyes," has just surprised himself by proposing marriage to a young cousin--a proposal that he sees as his "suddenly undertak[ing] to promote the moral order of the world" (42). That night, he experiences his "queer feeling," waking to the sense--and then the sight--of a pair of ghostly eyes. Culwin flees their presence, and flees his fiancée, too, embarking on a trajectory that will lead him to Europe, to Hong Kong, and, eventually, to the intimate library where he narrates his story to a few male friends whom he is lustily said to "lik[e] . . . juicy" (38). We might thus say that his "queer feeling" leads to Culwin's queer orientation. Then again, since this feeling was aroused by the suspicion that the room Culwin occupies has been mysteriously reconfigured, it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers University of Nebraska Press

"The Queer Feeling We All Know": Queer Objects and Orientations in Edith Wharton's (Haunted) Houses

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/the-queer-feeling-we-all-know-queer-objects-and-orientations-in-edith-QHTBP4MZ6J
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-0643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shannon Brennan Carthage College n the night that follows his impetuous stab at heteronormativity, Edith Wharton's queerest character is startled to consciousness by his sense of an intruding, untoward object. "I was waked by the queer feeling we all know," Andrew Culwin reflects, "--the feeling that there was something in the room that hadn't been there when I fell asleep" (43). Culwin, the interpellated narrator of "The Eyes," has just surprised himself by proposing marriage to a young cousin--a proposal that he sees as his "suddenly undertak[ing] to promote the moral order of the world" (42). That night, he experiences his "queer feeling," waking to the sense--and then the sight--of a pair of ghostly eyes. Culwin flees their presence, and flees his fiancée, too, embarking on a trajectory that will lead him to Europe, to Hong Kong, and, eventually, to the intimate library where he narrates his story to a few male friends whom he is lustily said to "lik[e] . . . juicy" (38). We might thus say that his "queer feeling" leads to Culwin's queer orientation. Then again, since this feeling was aroused by the suspicion that the room Culwin occupies has been mysteriously reconfigured, it

Journal

Legacy: A Journal of American Women WritersUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 20, 2017

There are no references for this article.