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"The Pulse and Conscience of America": The General Federation and Women's Citizenship, 1945–1960

"The Pulse and Conscience of America": The General Federation and Women's Citizenship,... “The Pulse and Conscience of America” The General Federation and Women’s Citizenship, 1945–1960 paige meltzer A “worthy” woman today faces many new and perplexing problems in her roles as wife, mother, homemaker, spiritual guide and community leader . . . She is not “just a housewife” . . . She is a good citizen. Eula C. Montgomery, GFWC, 1952 The General Federation of Women’s Clubs, an umbrella organization of six- teen thousand women’s clubs in the United States and overseas, believed that women’s public activism would strengthen American greatness at home and abroad, secure peace, and protect democracy in the years following World War II. General Federation clubwomen approached their work as women and grounded their activism in their identities as homemakers. They believed that women’s supposedly natural predisposition to nurture individuals and com- munities uniquely situated them to be leaders in all community projects, from isolated local initiatives to the grandest international peace-building strate- gies. Gravely concerned with the challenges facing the world during the tense early years of the Cold War, clubwomen accepted responsibility for preventing another world war and making the country safe for democracy. The broad scope of their project work informed everything clubwomen did http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

"The Pulse and Conscience of America": The General Federation and Women's Citizenship, 1945–1960

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 30 (3) – Feb 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

“The Pulse and Conscience of America” The General Federation and Women’s Citizenship, 1945–1960 paige meltzer A “worthy” woman today faces many new and perplexing problems in her roles as wife, mother, homemaker, spiritual guide and community leader . . . She is not “just a housewife” . . . She is a good citizen. Eula C. Montgomery, GFWC, 1952 The General Federation of Women’s Clubs, an umbrella organization of six- teen thousand women’s clubs in the United States and overseas, believed that women’s public activism would strengthen American greatness at home and abroad, secure peace, and protect democracy in the years following World War II. General Federation clubwomen approached their work as women and grounded their activism in their identities as homemakers. They believed that women’s supposedly natural predisposition to nurture individuals and com- munities uniquely situated them to be leaders in all community projects, from isolated local initiatives to the grandest international peace-building strate- gies. Gravely concerned with the challenges facing the world during the tense early years of the Cold War, clubwomen accepted responsibility for preventing another world war and making the country safe for democracy. The broad scope of their project work informed everything clubwomen did

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 4, 2010

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